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Advanced Creative Nonfiction Memoir: Revision, Editing, Workshopping, and Beyond with Patrick O'Neil
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This course will focus on fine tuning your memoir with a heavy emphasis on structure, revision, critique, editing, and finding your supportive writing community. There will be four lectures to read, and we will discuss several topics each week. Students will submit an already completed short work of nonfiction/memoir at the beginning of the course. Over the next three weeks the student submissions will be group workshopped via a discussion forum and each student will give feedback on the other student’s work. Students will then revisit their original submissions and revise them using the workshop critique and suggestions, instructor notes, and the ideas and materials that have been presented and discussed each week. On the final week they will submit their revised manuscript.    

March 6 - April 3, 2017

4-Week Course

CLASS OBJECTIVES

Students will be encouraged to develop their writing and revision skills within the context of Creative Nonfiction Memoir. We will learn to discuss, edit, revise and restructure our work. Our focus will be to learn how to fine tune a working first draft into a submit-able manuscript. The course will encourage students to consider the issues raised in the process of writing memoir, aiming to uncover various methods of confronting potential problems. Through lectures, group workshops, and discussions students will be provided information that they can use to analysis and revise their own writing.

 

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1: Editing – Trusting your editor: Learning how to accept criticism, critique, and feedback.
  • Student introductory discussion, and discussion on topic of lecture.  

  • Students submit short work of nonfiction/memoir (no more than 10 pages) to the group forum for workshopping.  

Week 2: Revision: Wordiness – Cut out the fat: Lean quick prose is the objective.
  • Student discussion on lecture topic.

  • Students workshop each other’s submissions (first half of student submissions).

  • Students work on writing exercise and revising their original submission.  

Week 3: Beginnings, Middles, and Endings – Revising structure, storyline, and all that’s in between.
  • Student discussion on lecture topic

  • Students workshop each other’s submissions (second half of student submissions).

  • Students work on writing exercise and revising their original submission.

Week 4: What’s Missing? Beta readers, workshops, and writing groups.
  • Students discussion on lecture topic, and the revision process.

  • Students submit revised original submission of nonfiction/memoir (no page limit).

ABOUT PATRICK O'NEIL

 photo patrick-oneil_zpsfj5fm1eh.jpg

Patrick O’Neil is the author of the memoir Gun, Needle, Spoon (Dzanc Books), and the excerpted in part French translation, Hold-Up (13e Note Editions). His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including: Juxtapoz, Salon.com, The Weeklings, Razorcake, Sensitive Skin, Fourteen Hills, and Word Riot.

Patrick is an editor for the NYC-to-California-transplant-post-beat-pre-apocalyptic art, writing, and music anthology Sensitive Skin Magazine. And a two time nominee for Best Of The Net. He is a regular contributor to the recovery website AfterPartyMagazine, and has been blogging at Full Blue Moon Dementia for over ten years. Patrick holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Antioch University Los Angeles, lives in Hollywood, California, and teaches at a local community college. Check out Patrick's web-site for more information www.patrick-oneil.com and his blog Full Blue Moon Dementia https://patrick-oneil.com/blog/

Sign up using the form below to notified when we offer this class next time! Email all of your questions to i2p@antioch.edu.





   

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Excavating Childhood: How to Write About Youth with Jenn Koiter
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Do you have childhood memories you want to mine for your writing? Examine how other writers have written successfully about their younger years through lively discussions of classic and contemporary writing. Explore ways to trigger childhood memories. Sculpt childhood experiences into poetry, creative nonfiction, or fiction. Workshop poems, essays, and stories with other writers in a structured, supportive environment.

 

December 1, 2014 - December 30, 2014

4-Week Course

 

Instructor Bio:

Jenn Koiter divides her time between Delhi and Los Angeles, where she attends the MFA program at Antioch University. Jenn is the recipient of a Jacob K. Javits Fellowship, a Money for Women/Barbara Deming Memorial Fund Grant, and two Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Poetry Prizes. She has also been awarded artist residencies at ART342 and the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts. Her work has appeared in the South Dakota Review, Bateau, Anti-, Copper Nickel, Rock & Sling, and No Tell Mote.


   

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Mask Appeal: Creating Compelling Persona Poems with Dana L. Stringer
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Mask Appeal: Creating Compelling Persona Poems

4-Week Online Writing Course

September 12 - October 10, 2016

Most readers assume that the speaker in a poem is the author of the poem, and the content of the poem reflects the experiences and sentiments of the poet. However, as poets, we do things to create a particular effect, and the use of a persona is one of those things. In other words, poets will wear a “mask” to conceal their identities in a poem for artistic purposes and to serve their poetic needs. 

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In this exciting course, for writers of all levels, students will learn what it means to wear the “mask” and explore the ways in which poets use personae. Students will read selected persona poems, sometimes called dramatic monologues, and explore their purpose and use. The course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to experiment with abandoning "I" or "self" by becoming "other" and writing in various personae.

CLASS OBJECTIVES

The primary goal of this course is to create a safe and supportive online environment where students can learn and explore creative possibilities within their own work through the use of a persona. By reading the selected poems, participating in online discussions, and completing the writing exercises, students will be able to gain insight on the topic of persona poetry as well as construct their own persona poems.

WHAT THIS COURSE WILL OFFER

Week 1

In the first week, students will learn about some of the various ways that contemporary poets utilize a persona in a poem. Students will read selected poetry, participate in the online discussion, and complete the first writing assignment. Students will also receive instructor and peer feedback on their poems.

Week 2

In the second week, students will learn how contemporary poets explore racial, social, cultural, and political issues through the use of a persona. Students will read selected poetry, participate in the online discussion, and complete the second writing assignment. Students will receive instructor and peer feedback on their poems.

Week 3

In the third week, students will discover the range of voice and pitch as they read and explore persona poetry that utilizes multiple voices/speakers in one poem. Students will read selected poetry, participate in the online discussion, and complete the third writing assignment. Students will receive instructor and peer feedback on their poems.

Week 4

In the final week, students will participate in an open forum discussion where we will address additional questions, topics, further readings, and opportunities concerning contemporary persona poetry.

ABOUT DANA L. STRINGER

Dana L. Stringer is a poet, playwright, instructor, and freelance writer.  She holds a Masters of Fine Arts in Creative Writing from Antioch University Los Angeles and a Bachelors of Arts from Morehead State University.  She is the author of In Between Faith, her debut poetry collection.  Dana’s work has appeared in anthologies and literary magazines, and she has served as a contributing writer for several cultural and entertainment websites.  In 2011, she served as an associate editor for Beyond Words:  The Creative Voices of WriteGirl, a literature anthology.  She has also been a featured poet in various venues.  Dana is also a produced playwright.  Her produced plays and staged readings include:  Kinsman Redeemer, ID, The Costume Waver, Solomon’s Porch, Colored in Winter, Secret Life in a Sacred House, and Looter.  For more information, visit www.danastringer.com.





 

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Page Turners: Writing Compelling Fiction with Eduardo Santiago
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Creative writing is one of the most fulfilling ways to express yourself, and you're never too young or too old to give it a try. But writing the kind of book that keeps readers turning pages requires a special set of skills. Today’s books are in competition with 3D movies, five hundred television channels, and thousands of video games. Far-flung travel and adventure are just a credit card away. But nothing grabs your imagination and holds it as firmly as a well-written book.

In this four-week course we'll focus on the balance of craftsmanship and imagination essential to creating compelling fiction while keeping your own, unique voice. In this class you will learn the time-tested elements of fiction and, through consistent instruction and practice, you'll discover which tools best serve your individual style and voice. Are you unsure which point of view to choose? Structure a problem? Writing convincing dialogue is a challenge? You've come to the right place!

This course is designed for those who have an idea for a book but are having trouble getting started, and for those who have started a book and are looking for guidance and mentoring to see them through to The End.

4-WEEK WRITING COURSE

October 8 - November 5, 2018

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Explore the untapped power of your imagination.

Discover what your book wants to say.

Create compelling characters.

Choose the right narrator.

Bring bland prose to life.

Write precise and sparkling dialogue.

Identify the selling points of your work.

WHAT THIS CLASS OFFERS:

How do writers create tension and anticipation without pandering or cheapening their writing? Together, we will examine and identify the essential elements in the compelling novel, and how to apply these elements to your work.

WEEKLY ACTIVITIES:

Week 1: Story structure and plot. Moving towards a complete, original, satisfying story sure to get your readers hooked. 

Week 2: Escalating conflict. Selecting character journeys and creating credible, stimulating conflicts.

Week 3: Tension, suspense, shock and surprise. Devising reversals and planning dramatic situations more like thrilla than vanilla.

Week 4: Fear and dread are your friend! Weighing emotional tension against physical tension. Looking at your life for suspense. 

YOU TAKE AWAY:

* Lessons that you can implement immediately, and a comprehensive resource that includes everything you need to write a successful novel.

* Sharpened creative writing skills, including improved narrative arc, world-building, authentic dialogue, and character development.

* A portfolio of twenty-five peer-critiqued pages.

* An overall story-focused critique of your pages by Eduardo Santiago.

ABOUT EDUARDO SANTIAGO:

Eduardo Santiago's first novel Tomorrow They Will Kiss was an Edmund White Debut Fiction Award finalist and won Latino Book Award for Best Historical Novel. His next book, Midnight Rumba, won the New England Book Award - Best Fiction. His short stories have appeared in ZYZZYVA, Slow Trains, and The Caribbean Writer, his nonfiction was published in the Los Angeles Times, The Advocate, and Out Traveler Magazine. A sought-after book coach and story editor, Mr. Santiago has helped dozens of writers reach The End.

Sign up using the form below to be notified when we offer this class next time! Email all your questions to i2p@antioch.edu

 

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Subvert the Trope! Storytelling Workshop with Haley Isleib
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Get ready to write! This course will take you from freewriting to peer-reviewed pages of a new story. Along the way, we’ll be intentionally using, subverting and smashing common tropes to generate and revise our work.

The course is intended for all writers. Many of the published stories we will examine will be from genres such as fantasy, fairytale and science fiction. We will also use film and television references in our discussions. However, tropes and archetypes are identifiable across all genres and the class will be useful whether you write contemporary literary fiction or epic undersea dystopias set on far away planets.

4-WEEK WRITING COURSE

February 18 - March 18, 2019               

OBJECTIVES:

  • Write and receive feedback on up to 10 pages of prose.
  • Explore archetypes, tropes and clichés to discover ways to use these concepts to spark ideas for stories, build and structure stories, and create delight and surprise for readers.
  • Build skills to identify story tropes in stories you read and in your own writing.
  • Receive and provide useful feedback on writing assignments, which will help you revise work.
  • By the end of this course, you will be able to identify tropes that resonate for you, and have tools to use this knowledge to create new fiction.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER:

Week 1 - We will develop a solid definition of a story trope (and cousin concepts like archetype and cliché) through reading assignments and discussion. Our writing this week will be informal freewriting to loosen up our trope-muscles and explore which tropes you might use for future assignments.

Week 2 - In our readings, we’ll examine methods for subverting tropes and upending expectation. Our writing this week will be up to ten pages of new fiction using a trope as a starting point. Write a short story or start something longer!

Week 3 - We’ll take a closer look at how story tropes arise from their cultural context and storytelling milieu. We’ll read and give feedback on each other’s pages and work on revising our own pages. You may be given personalized exercises tailored to your story.

Week 4 - We will explore a case study of one recent trope and how it evolved. We will turn in our revised pages and discuss what’s next for your story.

ABOUT HALEY ISLEIB: 

Haley Isleib writes in Portland, Oregon. She’s a fan of Story, all kinds in any format--books, movies, games, graphic novels, poems, miscellany found abandoned at bus stops, etc. Her writing has appeared in Daily Science Fiction, Every Day Fiction, Plasm and Fireweed: Poetry of Western Oregon, and she is the recipient of a fellowship in poetry from Literary Arts of Oregon. Her script Drones & Drivers won the Feature Script category at the Other Worlds Austin screenwriting competition in 2015 and her short films have screened in festivals on both sides of the Atlantic. She is currently a judge for the NYC Midnight Writing competitions.

 

She holds an MFA in Writing from Antioch University Los Angeles, with a focus on Writing for Young People. She’s the Programming Coordinator for the Oregon Writers Colony Annual Conference and volunteers with the Cascade Writers Workshop. Find more at haleyisleib.com.

 

 

 
 
 
   
 

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Feasting on Form: Noodling around with Experimental Creative Nonfiction with Arielle Silver
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Feasting on Form: Noodling around with Experimental Creative Nonfiction

Exploring structural inspiration for sensory writing:

From holiday feasting to grocery shopping, every bite-sized moment is ripe for narrative discovery. What’s in your pantry? What’s not being eaten? The sensory experience of simply squeaking a utensil drawer open can trigger inspiration, but how can we scoop it up? 

Constraints foster creativity. Think croissants, croutons, and loaves of challah: they’re all flour. Like a baker’s set of cake pans, here we’ll explore creative inspiration in the menu and the mess, and serve it up by way of experimental, hybrid, lyric essay.

4-WEEK WRITING COURSE

CLASS OBJECTIVES

* Discover creative inspiration within the common minutia and fodder of everyday life.

* Study and discuss the ways in which the assigned short pieces utilize found forms.

* Explore structural constraints to generate new material with imagery and other sensory detail.

* Write and revise short pieces of creative nonfiction that incorporate structure concepts inspired by the work we’ve read in class.

* Connect with other writers by reading their work and offering feedback.

COURSE DESCRIPTION

This course is a 4-week exploratory, generative writing course. Each week we will read short non-traditional essays inspired by found forms, generate three first drafts of new writing inspired by the form, and enjoy lively discussion in our classroom forum about the assigned readings and each other’s original drafts. The syllabus provides prompts to get the discussion going—but students are encouraged to come up with their own questions and food for thought.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1: Menu

We will begin with a brief tutorial on lyric essay and read the first short non-traditional piece. We will discuss the use of structure, and draft an original piece inspired by this form, due by Monday of Week 2.

Week 2: Recipe

In Week 2, we will read each other’s Week 1: Menu drafts and offer reflective feedback. Additionally, we will read and discuss a new non-traditional piece in a different format, and draft a new original work inspired by this form, due by Monday of Week 3.

Week 3: Feast

As before, in Week 3 we will read each other’s Week 2: Recipe drafts and offer reflective feedback. Additionally, we will read and discuss a new non-traditional piece in a different format, and draft a new original work inspired by this form, due by Monday of Week 4.

Week 4: After Dinner

In this final week, we will read each other’s Week 3: Feast drafts and offer reflective feedback. As before, we will read and discuss a final non-traditional piece in a new format. During the week, there is the option to generate another first draft of new original work inspired by this form or to submit a revision of writing from the Menu, Recipe, and Feast weeks for group discussion and/or instructor feedback.

ABOUT ARIELLE SILVER

Arielle Silver spends half her life hunting words, the rest singing and baking pies. And though she shivered through many Boston winters, the wind was blowing west, and her last music tour ended at the cliffs above El Matador beach on a night when the Pacific shimmered under a full moon. Since, her original music has been licensed internationally for film and television, and her essays have appeared in Literary Hub, Brevity, Gulf Stream, Moment, Lilith Magazine, and others. She is former editor-in-chief of Lunch Ticket and earned her MFA at Antioch University Los Angeles, where she now teaches in the MFA, BA, and Inspiration2publication programs. She is currently at work on a memoir about (step)mother/ing and a secret project inspired by the creative process. She is the co-creator of Create & Flow Retreats and lives in Los Angeles with her sweet & snarky family. www.ariellesilver.com @relsilver

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Writing the Community: Write to Effect Change! with Precious Rasheeda Muhammad
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"I'm interested in the way in which the past affects the present and I think that if we understand a good deal more about history, we automatically understand a great more about contemporary life."  —Toni Morrison

Explore what it means to write the community as a means of effecting change. We will study successful authors' stylistic approaches to writing for the community. We’ll examine how figures in our local communities have valuable stories that too often go untold, simply because they do not have national acclaim. We will learn creative approaches to documenting and sharing the stories of these people and how this is an effective means to “building community through history” across seemingly intractable divides. 

4-WEEK COURSE

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Articulate ideas about approaches to writing as a means to effect change in the community

Compose a short piece to submit for publication or donation to a local community organization or institution, for benefit of the greater community

Receive and give constructive feedback, as a trial run for engagement with larger audiences and engagement with the work of other authors

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER:

Week One: Got Character?

We will explore and discuss, through a brief lesson and assigned creative writing pieces, the key role effective characterization can play in writing the community. We will explore and discuss, through a brief lesson and assigned related texts, writing the community and writing to effect change. We will each draft an original piece based on what we learned in week one.

Week Two: Do You See What I See?

We will explore and discuss, through a brief lesson and assigned creative writing pieces, the key role effective imagery can play in writing the community. We will explore and discuss, through a brief lesson and assigned related texts, writing the community and writing to effect change. We will explore and discuss, through a brief tutorial, how to give and receive constructive feedback. We will read and discuss week one’s original piece and each draft a new original piece (or take the option to build on the previous week’s piece) based on what we learned in week two.

Week Three: Make a Scene! 

We will explore and discuss, through a brief lesson and assigned creative writing pieces, the key role effective dialogue and balancing of scene versus summary can play in writing the community. We will explore and discuss, through a brief lesson and assigned related texts, writing the community and writing to effect change. We will read and discuss week two’s original piece and each draft an original piece (or take the option to build on the previous week’s piece) based on what we learned in week three.

Week Four: It's a Wrap (Up)! 

We will read and discuss week three’s piece. We will each pick one of the submitted pieces from the past three weeks to revise and polish into a final piece. We will receive one last round of feedback from each other. We will discuss submission or donation options of the final piece.

ABOUT PRECIOUS RASHEEDA MUHAMMAD

Precious received her MFA in Creative Writing and Writing for the Performing Arts from the University of California Riverside, Palm Desert in 2016. She received her Master of Theological Studies from Harvard University. She is an author, lecturer, and researcher on religion in America, among other topics, and is known by many as “The History Detective.” She lives in Virginia with her family but travels frequently for research projects and speaking engagements. Her motto: “building community through history.” Her favorite craft-related, self-motivational saying: “write mama write.”

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Writing Through Trauma with Patrick O'Neil
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Writing Through Trauma

4-Week Online Writing Class

CLASS DESCRIPTION

When we experience a traumatic event, our memories are affected. Our perception of that event, and previous events can be negatively influenced. This negative influence can manifest itself as fear, resentment, and anger. All, or any of these, will affect our behaviors, relationships, abilities, and self-esteem—in short, our entire lives.

By learning to decipher what are actual memories and what are imagined, we can navigate the emotional obstacles of guilt, fear, shame, ego, and resentment; while exposing whatever secrets we are holding onto that are causing us emotional pain. And, as writers, working through our trauma will open up vast areas that we previously feared to explore. This will not be therapy. It is more an honest evaluation of self that will result in writing an in depth personal essay.

CLASS OBJECTIVES

• Participants will be encouraged to honestly write about their own traumatic event.

• Group discussions will focus on the way that we remember traumatic events by analyzing memory and how it is often at times faulty due to emotional input of resentments, the passing of time, and fear.

• Writing exercises will help examine perspective. By exposing the past we prevent it from continuing to influence the present. Allowing us to live healthier, more functional lives.

• Posting our work to the discussions will allow participants the opportunity to engage in divulging our secrets so we can lessen their influence on our present, and ascertain what is reality as opposed to our unhealthy misconceptions.

• Instructor will take the participants through the revision process from a first draft to a well-crafted personal essay.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1: Personal Experiences

Lecture: My Personal Experience with Writing About a Traumatic Event. Students will complete the first writing assignment. Student introductory discussion.

Week 2: Memory

Lecture: Memory, The Reliability of, and The Influence of Emotions. Students will complete the second writing assignment. Discussion on lecture topic.

Week 3: Shame, Guilt, Secrets

Lecture: The Emotional Effects of Shame, Guilt, Fear, Ego, Anger, Resentments, and Keeping Secrets. Students will complete the third writing assignment. Student discussion on lecture topic.

Week 4: Forgiveness

Lecture: Forgiveness: Of Self and Others. Writing assignment: revision. Student discussion on lecture topic, and the process of revision.

Each week there will be a lecture, a discussion forum, a writing assignment, and optional extra reading material. Instructor gives detailed feedback on the first assignment and works with participant to revise and edit that assignment for a final draft.

ABOUT PATRICK O'NEIL

Patrick O’Neil is the author of the memoir Gun, Needle, Spoon (Dzanc Books). His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including Juxtapoz, Salon, The Nervous BreakdownAfter Party Magazine, and Razorcake. O’Neil is a contributing editor for Sensitive Skin Magazine, a Pushcart nominee, a two time nominee for Best Of The Net, and a PEN Center USA Professional and former Mentor. He holds an MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles where he is an instructor for the inspiration2publication program. Most days you can find him teaching some form of creative writing at various rehabs, correctional facilities, institutions, and workshopsand he is the co-coordinator for the Why There Are Words, Los Angeles reading series. O’Neil currently lives in L.A.’s monument to broken dreams, the über hip downtown district, with his fiancé and two giant Maine Coons. For more information, please visit: patrick-oneil.com.

 

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