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Professional Development Package
$178.00
September 25 - October 30, 2017
Professional Development Package
$178.00
| Led By September 25 - October 30, 2017
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Kick off your 2017 school year with a real-life plan to take your writing career to the next level. These two practical and affordable courses are designed to bring your work out into the world.

Kate Maruyama will walk you through the process of finding journals, writing submission letters and submitting your work in "SUBMIT! How to get your work out there"September 25 - October 9, 2017

Lilly Barels will help you complete a final draft of a query letter, understand how to find the right agent for the manuscript being queried, and recognize when to query in "Art of the Query Letter: How to Woo an Agent from the Slush Pile", October 16 - October 30

The price is at $178, which is a 10% discount from the sum of the two classes combined.

 

SUBMIT! How to get your work out there with Kate Maruyama
$99.00
September 25 - October 9, 2017
SUBMIT! How to get your work out there with Kate Maruyama
$99.00
| Led By September 25 - October 9, 2017
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BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!

Every time we run this class, students get published!

You can write and write and get better, but unless you submit your work widely, it might never meet its readers. Submitting your work takes courage, persistence and knowhow. So many people give up after one or two rejections. Learn how to effectively submit your fiction, non-fiction, poetry and articles to literary journals, online journals and other publications.

September 25 - October 9, 2017

2-Week Class

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In a two week intensive course, I’ll walk you through the submission process for fiction, non-fiction and poetry, from scouting websites and journals to how to get over yourself, move past the rejection process and use submission for what it is: just another everyday part of the business.

CLASS OBJECTIVES

*Learn the ins and outs of literary journals, what they look for and how they work

*Create your own list of journals or publications open to your kind of work

*Submit a piece (or several pieces) of your work at least five places

*Obtain the tools to keep submitting on your own well into the future

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week One: The Lay of the Land

We’ll discuss what’s out there publication-wise: the ins and outs of various types of journals and various types of submissions and we’ll create a plan for what you want from your work as you send it out in the world.

You’ll become acquainted with Duotrope, which will help you navigate the world of literary journals and will help you in your submission plan. (note this service costs $5.00 to be paid to DuoTrope) You will also learn how to keep track of where you submit your work and how to gauge editors’ responses.

Week Two: Submit!

I’ll walk you through query letters, submission letters, how to approach editors and how to see the positive in rejections. You’ll submit at least five places and finish class armed with the tools and knowledge to keep getting your work out there as you forge forward in your writing career.

ABOUT KATE MARUYAMA

Kate Maruyama's novel HARROWGATE was published by 47North. Her short work has appeared in Arcadia, Stoneboat, Whistling Shade and on Salon, Duende, The Rumpus among other journals as well as in two anthologies: Winter Horror Days and Phantasma: Stories. She teaches in the BA and MFA programs for Antioch University Los Angeles as well as for Writing Workshops Los Angeles and the inspiration2publication program. She writes, teaches, cooks and eats in Los Angeles where she lives with her family.

 

Your Voice Inside the Picture: Poetry with Adrian Ernesto Cepeda
$99.00
| Led By September 25 - October 9, 2017
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“That you are here…that life exists and identity. That the powerful [picture] goes on, and you may contribute a verse. What will your verse be?”

— Robin Williams as John Keating in Dead Poets Society

You can find inspiration for poetry everywhere! In this two-week workshop, we'll create poetry, using Pinterest, Instagram, Facebook and Tumblr as sparks of visual inspiration. You will learn the craft of ekphrastic poetry. Taking images from your cell phone or computer, you will look at your social media feed in a whole new way, as a launching pad for your own creative vision.  And at the end of two weeks, you will walk away with a few fantastic ekphrastic poems of your own.

2 Week Online Writing Course

Learning Objectives

By the end of this course writers will be able to:

  • Draft, revise and edit a skillfully crafted ekphrasis poem
  • Research using the internet, bookmarks and social media feed by finding sources, posts and photographs that will inspire their work
  • Engage in drafting, revision and learning how to share and give feedback on their poetry.
  • Explore new and more challenging strategies on embracing your personally unique social media universe for writing poetry.

Week 1:

The first week we will learn the various types of ekphrastic poems by looking at poetry inspired by famous photographs and paintings. You will discover how posts, photographs and your daily interactions on your social media feed (Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and Pinterest) can inspire your poetry. You will  compose an ekphrastic poem with your classmates as a group writing exercise. By the end of Week 1, you will begin locating photographs and paintings from your social media feed and start crafting drafts of your first individual ekphrastic poems.

Week 2:

You will begin posting photographs and paintings from your unique social media feeds along with the poems you have crafted from those images. Your classmates will respond to each poem by giving positive feedback and you will all assist each other in crafting your own effective ekphrastic poems. 

If you choose to share your work, a collection of student work from this class will be featured on inspiration2publication’s blog at the end of Week Two.  

By the end of this two week class, you will have embraced the creative glory of crafting an ekphrastic poem. Remember that your internet social media universe is unique to you. Use those posts and photographs as inspirations to spark your imagination. Douglas Adams said it best: “Everything you see or hear or experience in any way at all is specific to you. You create a universe by perceiving it, so everything in the universe you perceive is specific to you.”

Your voice will always be inside the picture. Focus on the page and write the verse that reflects the picture of you. 

Adrian Ernesto Cepeda is an LA Poet and a graduate of the MFA program at Antioch University in Los Angeles where he lives with his wife and their cat, Woody Gold. His poetry has been featured in The Yellow Chair Review, Frontier Poetry, The Fem, The Wild Word and he has three poems included in the 2016 anthology of Los Angeles Poets: Coiled Serpent: Poets Arising from the Cultural Quakes & Shifts of Los Angeles.

To date, Adrian has over two hundred poems published in over a hundred and fifty different publications.  One of his poems was named the winner of Subterranean Blue Poetry’s 2016 "The Children of Orpheus" Anthology Contest and two of his poems “Buzz Me” and “Estranged Fruit” were nominated for Best of the Net in 2015 and 2016, respectively. Adrian also had one of his poems “Longing for Our Airport Reconnections” featured in Shinpei Takeda’s Poems of Arrival for the Inscription Installation Exhibit at the New Americans Museum in San Diego, California.

You can connect with Adrian on his website: https://www.adrianernestocepeda.com/

 

Let's Write a Short Story with Natalie Truhan
$199.00
October 9 - November 6, 2017
Let's Write a Short Story with Natalie Truhan
$199.00
| Led By October 9 - November 6, 2017
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“When seriously explored, the short story seems to me the most difficult and disciplining form of prose writing extant. Whatever control and technique I may have I owe entirely to my training in this medium.”~ Truman Capote, interview to The Paris Review.

 

October 9 - November 6, 2017

4-Week Writing Course

This course will take you from story inception to a finished draft through several stages of revision. Along the way, you will learn elements of a short story. Our goal is creating a story that, as the writer Michael Swanwick put it, “is like a knife–strongly made, well balanced, and with an absolute minimum of moving parts.”

I want you to become a radical explorer of your story and its possibilities. I will encourage you to approach your story from different angles, striving to better understand your artistic intention and ways to realize it. 

The course is designed for writers of fiction who want to explore a structured approach to developing a traditional story, as well as for writers of creative nonfiction and poetry who want to delve into writing short fiction.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

By the end of this course, the students will be able to:

• identify the initial idea for a short story;
• develop a short story by exploring point of view, characterization, timeline, sensory detail, imagery, and more;
• share their work in progress and provide feedback which will help their peers write the best possible story.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER: 

In Week 1 we will learn to identify the protagonist and the story.

In Week 2 we will do what Antonya Nelson calls “putting a clock on the story”.

In Week 3 we will explore theme and imagery.

In Week 4 will do something crazy and discuss what’s next for your story.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:

• Writing exercises: Each week students will complete writing assignments that will take their stories from the initial idea to the finished draft.

• Share work and provide feedback in discussion forums: Students will post their writing and give feedback on each other’s work.

• Assigned readings: Students will read assigned short stories and discuss them in forums to develop a better understanding of elements of short fiction.

• Progress discussions: Students will be encouraged to discuss their progress and reflect on their process.

ABOUT NATALIE TRUHAN: 

natalie-truhan

Natalie received her MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles. She is a former Translation Editor of The Lunch Ticket literary journal. She lives in Los Angeles where she writes fiction and translates poetry. Connect with Natalie on Twitter or on Instagram.    

 

Are You Talking to Me? The Craft of Writing Believable and Intriguing Dialogue with Patrick O'Neil
$99.00
| Led By October 16 - October 30, 2017
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Let’s say you’ve just written the next great American novel, or maybe you’ve finally completed your creative nonfiction memoir, and while your story and structure rocks the goddamn dialogue falls so flat it’s completely destroying all your hard work. Because somehow what you imagined the characters saying wasn’t what comes off the page and it’s frustrating as hell. So okay, then consider this two-week course your hi-octane speed date with dialogue. Through two weekly lectures, ongoing group discussions, and plenty of thought provoking writing exercises, we’re going to dissect and examine dialogue to find out what makes good dialogue, and how you can get your dialogue to be great.

October 16 - October 30, 2017

2-Week Course

 

CLASS OBJECTIVES:

-- Learn to listen for the flow and rhythm of natural conversations

-- Understand how to edit dialogue down to its bare essentials

-- Recognize when you need dialogue to augment narrative

-- Create fully realized “characters” through their dialogue

 

Learning Activities:

-- Research dialogue from your favorite authors and discuss why their dialogue works.

-- Write short “conversational” exercises to understand the natural flow of speech

-- Share assignments with peers to broaden your understanding of what works and what doesn’t

-- Take the craft and techniques you’ve learned/discussed and implementing it into your own writing

 

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

 

Week 1:

-- Read lecture on dialogue and engage in group discussion of the material.

-- Become familiar with dialogue’s punctuation, grammar, and syntax

-- Writing exercises: chronicling daily conversations gleaned from real life

-- Present writing exercises for critique and discussion with other students in group discussion

-- Submit up to five pages of a working manuscript for critique on the existing dialogue

Week 2:

-- Read lecture on dialogue and engage in group discussion of the material.

-- Research dialogue from your favorite authors and then present it to the group discussion and discuss why you feel their dialogue works.

-- Writing exercise: write a coherent conversation with three or more characters without using dialogue tags.  

-- Present exercise for critique with other students in group discussion

-- Receive line edits and overall notes from instructor on your submitted working manuscript.  

ABOUT PATRICK O'NEIL

Patrick O’Neil is the author of the memoir Gun, Needle, Spoon (Dzanc Books). His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including Juxtapoz, Salon, The Nervous BreakdownAfter Party Magazine, and Razorcake. O’Neil is a contributing editor for Sensitive Skin Magazine, a Pushcart nominee, a two time nominee for Best Of The Net, and a PEN Center USA Professional and former Mentor. He holds an MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles where he is an instructor for the inspiration2publication program. Most days you can find him teaching some form of creative writing at various rehabs, correctional facilities, institutions, and workshopsand he is the co-coordinator for the Why There Are Words, Los Angeles reading series. O’Neil currently lives in L.A.’s monument to broken dreams, the über hip downtown district, with his fiancé and two giant Maine Coons. For more information, please visit: patrick-oneil.com.

 

Art of the Query Letter: How to Woo an Agent from the Slush Pile with Lilly Barels
$99.00
| Led By October 16 - October 30, 2017
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So, you wrote a book and now it's waiting to be on bookshelves. If you aren't planning to self-publish and the owner of Penguin Random House isn't your cousin, then you probably need a literary agent. Join me for this 2-week crash course that'll get you down and dirty with the elusive query letter. We'll use real examples that worked--including mine! And create a plan of action for taking your query into the world of literary agent slush piles. 


(P.S. if you aren't sure what the heck a slush pile is, I'll be sure to explain that too).

September 16 - October 30, 2017

2-Week Course

CLASS OBJECTIVES

-- Complete a final draft of a query letter
-- Understand how to find the right agent for the manuscript being queried
-- Recognize when to query
-- Create an action plan for the querying process
 
Learning Activities:
-- Research/read successful query letters and understand why they work
-- Write a complete query letter
-- Share query drafts with peers to discuss strengths and opportunities for growth

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1:
-- Read real samples of successful query letters
-- Become familiar with the essential paragraph structure of a query letter
-- Write the first draft of a query letter
-- Trade queries with other students and provide/receive feedback
-- Start the query action plan
Week 2:
-- Understand the slush pile of a literary agent's inbox
-- Identify three agents that the student would like to query
-- Discover the general process of querying, which includes setting realistic expectations regarding the email process and receiving manuscript requests
-- Complete the final draft of the query letter
-- Complete the query action plan
 

ABOUT LILLY BARELS
 

A decade after receiving her BS in neuroscience from UCLA and being named Valedictorian, Lilly decided to pursue her true passion for writing and received her MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles in 2014. She resides on Oahu as a full-time mother of two sandy children and a part-time writer of three novels. Lilly enjoys being an active member of the SCBWI and incorporates avocado into every possible meal. She is represented by Sarah LaPolla of Bradford Literary Agency. Connect with Lilly on Twitter @lillybarels

 

Crafting Your Hood: Travel Writing From Your Own Backyard with Julie Graham
$199.00
| Led By October 30 - November 20, 2017
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You don’t have to go to Tokyo, Paris or Abu Dhabi to create an engaging and informative travel essay. Travel narration can come from journeying into your own neighborhood and exploring your town or city through the eyes of a travel writer. This class will show you how to discover the hidden treasures around the corner that can become opportunities for travel essays. I’ll encourage you to look for the unique features of the place you call home, and help you get started on a well-crafted essay for future publication. Along the way we’ll look at what makes an exceptional travel essay, different formats used in the travel writing industry, and we’ll delve into structural tricks of the trade that will deeply engage your reader.

4-WEEK CLASS

October 30 - November 20, 2017

Class Objectives

 

*Explore the many different types of travel writing, including: promotional, narrative essay, blog and travelogue.

* Design a self-guided tour of your city, identifying unique writing opportunities.

*Employ your travel writer’s toolbox, playing with literary devices and structural techniques designed to enhance your writing.

 *Develop an outline for your local journey piece using the techniques and formats you’ve studied throughout the class.

* Create the first two paragraphs and broad outline of your narrative travel essay to share with your online classmates and teacher.

Class Offerings

 

Week One

You’ll form an understanding of the extensive category of travel writing as we talk about the different styles and formats of the genre and the major differences between them. Reading excerpts of writings from literary travel narrative, contemporary travelogues and current blogs, we will discuss the travel writer’s “voice” and how they act as both narrator and participant.

Week Two   

The journey begins! First we will discuss setting and sense of place in travel writing.  After walking or driving around your neighborhood, town or city, you’ll begin to look at it through your new understanding of “travel writer’s eyes. ” Offering up ideas that interest you, you’ll sift through the options thinking about what you want your readers to learn. What draws you in? Will it be an historical restaurant? An old bodega? A lovely park with native plants? A broad overview of the town as a whole? Discussing the various options will help you define your intention for the essay.

Week Three  

This week you’ll get to know your travel writer’s toolbox including: varied and rich sensory details, the art of research, syntax and diction,  humor and pathos, and an understanding of the narrator’s role. You will also begin to outline your travel essay in broad strokes.

Week Four

On this last week, you will submit an opening and second paragraph of a travel essay based on your neighborhood, town or city, which will be available to all students for comments. You may also submit a final outline of the full travel essay (optional).

You’ve learned a lot about the world of travel writing in these four weeks and now you’re equipped and well on your way to creating a rich, detailed and engaging narrative travel essay about the place you call home.

About Julie C. Graham

Julie has written award-winning articles on Halloween in Obidos, Portugal, theater costuming in Berkley, California and izakaya-hopping in Tokyo.  Her work has appeared in Pilot Getaways, including destination vacation pieces on Sundance, Utah and St. Helena, Carmel and San Diego, California. Although trained as a news journalist, her penchant is for literary travel essays and memoir.  She earned her degree in Communications and Journalism from Mills College and her Masters in Creative Writing from Antioch University, Los Angeles.  Julie has two teenaged kids and a dog named Jasper; all of them drive her crazy, but when she travels, she misses them fiercely.

 

How to Make Your Novel More Cinematic for the Reader with John Reedburg
$199.00
| Led By October 30 - November 20, 2017
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Class Description

Nowadays, novelists are using cinematic technique to create visually dynamic scenes. Readers, use to watching movies and TV, have come to expect a more cinematic experience when they read. They want to watch the story unfold before their eyes rather than be told what is happening in summary or exposition. In film, the story is conveyed visually by a series of camera angles which are edited together to create each scene. This class will offer writers an opportunity to do the same in their writing by examining how to not only implement the deliberate use of camera shots, but also how to break scenes down into segments and identify the key moments in their story.

This class is intended to help writers understand how the use of cinematic elements within a scene affects the mood, focus, and emphasis of the story being told.

4-WEEK CLASS

October 30 - November 20, 2017

Class Objectives

*Read and examine different scenes from novels and discuss as a group how the writer used cinematic techniques to emphasize the story being told.

*Learn and identify the various shot angles that could be used in your prose.

*Learn how to write a scene for your novel with cinematic techniques of your choosing.

*Identify and discuss what cinematic techniques that you are considering using in the future.

Class Layout

In Week 1 we will learn the different type of cinematic techniques that can be used in your writing. Filmic methods will include the following practices listed below.

*Identifying and breaking down the key elements in a scene.

*Consider the POV of a character or narrator.

*Adding background noise to strengthen the meaning of a character.

*Coloring scenes to add symbolism, motif, and/or psychological effects.

*Using camera angles to add visual power.

*Adding texture and detail to bring excitement to a scene.

In Weeks 2 and 3 we will do written exercises implementing the techniques listed above.

In Week 4 we will rewrite a scene from our novel or short story implementing all the cinematic techniques we’ve learned.

Learning Activities

*Group discussion forum on assigned readings and on readings students bring in to share.

*Writing prompts and exercises to practice how to write more cinematically.

*Scene submission of (no more than five pages) from a story written by students for group discussion. The group will examine each story for cinematic techniques that are already evident, and if there any methods to be used in strengthening the piece. Students will revise their work based on notes from the group.

*Comments and constructive criticism on classmate’s writing.

*Post at least twice a week.

*Work must be completed every Sunday before midnight.

About John Reedburg

Every narrative begins with a canvas. Every word we write is a brushstroke that comes from our imagination. Let’s paint that story! As your instructor, I will guide you in completing the bigger picture. I am here to help you with your essays, short stories, manuscripts, and screenplays.

John Reedburg is an award-winning writer and filmmaker. He has a degree in Journalism from EL Camino College, a degree in Digital Media from California State University, Dominguez Hills, an MFA in Screenwriting and Directing from Chapman University, and an MFA in Creative Writing from Antioch University, Los Angeles.

He can be reached at jreedburg@antioch.edu

 

Mommie Brain: Document Your Parenting Journey with Rachel Schinderman
$199.00
| Led By October 30 - November 20, 2017
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My mom used to say, "Write it down, you'll forget."  And in that way how moms are usually right, she was right.  If I don't write it down, I do forget, but if I do actually write it down I usually discover and remember and experience more. This is why we write. This is why we document.

COURSE DESCRIPTION: Motherhood today is all encompassing.  Writing about motherhood fills every corner of the internet.  There are articles, listicles, pieces of advice, and everything in between covering every aspect of parenting, momoir as some call it; the heart of which is the personal essay. Documenting our children on the internet to scrapbooking to keeping old report cards is not new.  Exploring our own experiences as mothers though through essays and stories is. Whether you keep a memory journal, document a birth experience, or are trying to have an article published, this class will provide those tools.  This class will provide an opportunity for women to document their pregnancies as well as the experience of being a mother.

This class is designed to help capture a fleeting but important time in our lives as mothers, and to explore Momoir.  Let’s take our documenting of our kids beyond the scrapbook and let’s explore our own experiences as well.

Come exercise your Mommie Brain!

4-WEEK CLASS

October 30 - November 20, 2017

CLASS OBJECTIVES:

Identify, study, and compare different essays in momoir.

Develop free writing skills.

Create a writing routine.

Compose an essay that fits into momoir.

Learn about the motherhood essay market.

 

What This Class Will Offer:

Week One: I’m the Kind of Mother Who…

We will explore and read a few published essays in this form, both funny and more serious. 

We start JOT DOWN TIME, free writing to capture the moments we always think we will remember as we parent but most likely won’t.  We will do this each week.

We will answer the question, “I am the kind of mother who…” to be able to get to know each other and to explore where your story may lead.

Week Two: Other Mothers

We will share essays and articles with each other in this genre that we have discovered on our own and discuss what works and maybe what doesn’t.

We continue with Jot Down Time and a free write prompt.

We will start to pin down what you will write for an essay.  What is your story?

Week Three: Because I Said So… :-)

Continuing with reading and discussing published pieces and jot down time and writing prompts, we will review the first draft of your essay.  Writing is rewriting.  What does rewriting look like?  It looks different to most people, and we will explore applying notes and edits and sitting with your work this week.  Rewriting could be a walk in the park while your child naps in the stroller or it could be the quiet in the middle of the night, which as mothers we see a lot of.

Week Four: Separation Anxiety

Motherhood can be very isolating but when you find a community of other mothers, it can provide great comfort in a trying time.  We will present our final pieces and provide notes for each other as we continue to explore and share momoir and our own writing routines.

For those who want to explore publishing in this field we will also discuss the many avenues of parenting websites and magazines.

ABOUT RACHEL SCHINDERMAN

Rachel Zients Schinderman is a writer, teacher, and mother living in Los Angeles. As a teacher, she is the creator of the writing groups for moms, Mommie Brain  (www.mommiebrain.com), which was featured in Daily Candy.  As a writer she has had her work appear in the Los Angeles Jewish Journal, The Nervous Breakdown, The Manifest Station, The LA Times Magazine to name a few and had an ongoing column about parenting in The Santa Monica Daily Press also called Mommie Brain. As a mom she has two sons, ages 7 and 11. Learn more at rachelschinderman.journoportfolio.com or www.mommiebrain.com to read some of her work. She is also a regular performer in the hit show Expressing Motherhood and has placed twice in LA Parent's Moms Who Write Contest.  She has a Masters in Professional Writing from The University of Southern California and a Teaching Certificate from Antioch University, but more than all of that, she is excited by other people's stories and helping them discover them.  

 

The Phases of Military Deployment and the Poetry Within with John Holt
$199.00
| Led By October 30 - November 20, 2017
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Ever since the revolution of our Republic there have always been poets within the ranks of the military and family members supporting them telling our nation’s story. Soldiers, sailors, Marines, airman, and family members have written poems that capture the various deployment phase experiences that were at the center of the American nature of war. All these poems have historical value as lasting testimony of the men and women who experienced it directly and are poems that every American needs to read in order to better understand what it means to deploy.

This course is designed to provide and introduction to the Armed Forces, American involvement in War since World War II, the four phases of deployment and the war poem for students who may not have had the opportunity for a meaningful exploration.  

4-WEEK CLASS

October 30 - November 20, 2017

Class Objectives:

In discussing the four phases of deployment we will be reading numerous poems to better understand what it means to deploy. At the conclusion of the course, students will demonstrate the ability to:

Recognize poets who served in the U.S. Armed Forces.

Identify the various war poems from World War II to Present.

Understand the four phases of deployment and examine the elements of imagery in war poems and identify the phase a poem best represents.

Connect learning to lived experience and real-life current news (veteran or military related); by writing a poem.

Offerings:

Week One: Military Service: The What, When, and Who

You’ll be given an overview of the branches of the Armed Forces, the American Involvement in War from World War II to Present day, and poets who served during each.

Afterwards, you will be asked to go into the world and look for these poets and poems. Choose three poems that resonated with you and tell us why you choose the poet and poem, tell us what happened in the poem, tell us when and where did the poem take place, and  tell us how did you feel after reading it?

Week Two: Phases of Military Deployment

You’ll be given an overview of the phases of military deployment. We will discuss timeframes, what service members go through and the emotions that might arise from both the service member and family member.

You’ll become acquainted with The Awareness and Reflection of War Experience (ARWE) Model that was developed to assists readers of war poems decide which phase the poem best represents.

Afterwards, you will take the entire sample of poems from you classmates and using the ARWE model try to match the poems to the phase they best represents. Then you will pick four of your poems and write one paragraph telling us why you placed it in that phase.

Week Three: Imagery in War Poetry (World War II to Present Day)

You’ll be given an overview of how with the advent of technological advances in weaponry and means to save lives in war, the images of war found in poems can linger much longer and can be tied to emotions that carry across several generations. You will become acquainted the five senses will be asked to look for and describe them from a sampling of poems.

Week Four: Write your own poem about War

You will be asked to take a poem that you wrote your paragraphs about, the imagery found in poems we have discussed, and our other class discussions and use them as a references to write your own poem about war.

ABOUT JOHN HOLT

John Holt is an author and poet. He is a 23 year veteran of the U.S. Air Force and a former Associate Professor at Loyola Marymount University. He has served in multiple locations in the United States and overseas in the Pacific Region. He deployed to the Middle East from 2009 to 2010. After retiring from active duty, he moved to Los Angeles and began working with other veterans in creative writing fellowships with the University of Southern California Warrior Chorus and the Writers Guild Foundation Veterans Writing Project. Holt's writing has appeared in a short film and in the following publications: Sketchbook: A Journal for Eastern & Western Short Forms, Asahi Haikust Network, Stylus Poetry Journal, Autumn Leaves Journal, 3Lights Gallery, The Mainichi Daily News, White Lotus: A Journal of Short Asian Verse & Haiga, The Heron’s Nest, PEN HIMALAYA Literary Magazine, Magnapoets, Frogpond, The Mie Times, JAL Foundation, Simply Haiku: A Quarterly Journal of Japanese Short Form Poetry, Sugar Mule Literary Magazine, Icebox and Acorn: A Journal of Contemporary Haiku. John is a graduate of both Park and Webster Universities and is expected to graduate with a MFA in Creative Writing from Antioch University in December 2017.

 

THE POWER OF PLACE: Telling a Story from the Ground Up! with Dominique De Fazio
$199.00
| Led By October 30 - November 20, 2017
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Develop your capacity to notice the integration of what people say and do with the physical, situational context in which their words and actions take place.

Learn how to establish the place of a story – Its sensations, its size, the quality of time, the situation – as the soil from which the events of a scene will grow.

Explore the integrate of human “happenings” with the place in which they occur. 

Join me in this writing workshop to learn strategies for taking rage, fear, and heartbreak and turn them into pieces of art that may hold the power to spark change.

4-WEEK CLASS

October 30 - November 20, 2017

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

·“The Verb’s The Thing”:  Study how verbs can suggest the sensory details of a place, catch the rhythm of the place, and suggest the kinds of movement and changes that are possible.

“Breathing Land, Breathing Space”:  Consider how the space of a setting (its volume and its permission for movement) may seem to expand or contract like a breath within the experience of a character.

“Making an Entrance”:  Learn how to introduce a character into the place, continuing the rhythm of the place in the character’s rhythm of thought, or speech, or physical actions.

“Birthing a Scene”:  Write a scene of one to two pages, with two characters, using both dialogue an description, in which the place gives birth to the words and actions of the scene.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week One: Facing the Difficult

 

How do you write about a social justice issue that is difficult, and perhaps even physically painful, to look at? This week we will read pieces by Juan Felipe Herrera, Claudia Rankine, and Ashaki M. Jackson looking for strategies to trick the mind into writing about a difficult topic. We will write new pieces using at least one strategy from the readings.   

 

Week Two: Hooking an Audience

How do you get an audience to read a piece about a social justice issue that is difficult to look at or spend time with? This week we will read pieces by Martin Espada, Carolyn Forche, and Javier Zamora looking for strategies to hook the reader. We will write new pieces using at least one strategy from the readings. 

Week Three: Working the Writing

Everyone will submit one piece to be workshopped by the group with the objective of revising the piece based off feedback for the following week. 

Week Four: Finding a Home

We will survey current open calls for social justice and resistant pieces as well as look at ongoing social media campaigns such as Poets Responding to SB1070 and #blackpoetsspeakout in order to find possible places to submit or post new work generated in the workshop.  

 

ABOUT DOMINIQUE DE FAZIO

 

 

Introduction to Fiction
$199.00
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Introduction to Fiction

Learn the basics of fiction and start working on a short story or a novel in this recurring course taught by one of our fiction instructors. 

inspiration2publication offers this 4-week online workshop on a regular basis when we get at least three students to sign up. Let us know if you want to take this course with your writing group! 

Sign up using the form below to be notified when we offer this workshop next time! Email all your questions to i2p@antioch.edu

Introduction to Fiction

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