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Rub a Little Funny on It: Humor in Short Fiction with Robert Morgan Fisher
$199.00
| Led By March 27 - April 24, 2017
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Rub a Little Funny on It: Humor in Short Fiction
An Essential Ingredient in ALL Writing:

We writers take ourselves SO seriously. But guess what? Even dramatic writing requires nuanced humor. Some say “Humor is a natural gift—it can’t be taught.” WRONG. It’s a process—just like anything else! But one has to learn how to use certain tools as well as study writers and stories that successfully employ humor. FACT: When forced to choose between two equally good stories—editors will go with the one that makes them smile every time.

March 27 - April 24, 2017

CLASS DESCRIPTION

Even the most dramatic narratives have elements of humor. One might say they require it. Under the most desperate, dramatic circumstances there is always humor lurking. It’s often the only thing that can get us through. Where would a tragic novel like Ken Kesey’s One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest be without McMurphy’s boisterous, ribald humor? In Thomas Harris’ Silence of the Lambs, Hannibal’s depraved sense of humor charms us against our will, giving this complicated villain immeasurable depth. By studying and discussing a variety of select short stories (both dramatic and funny), we will explore how to infuse your writing with whatever humor is required to make the story irresistible. Oh—and did I mention? We’re going to laugh. A LOT! 

CLASS OBJECTIVES

* Study and discuss the ways in which the assigned short stories utilize humor.

* Learn practical techniques for injecting humor into your story organically.

* Explore how humor can be an integral part of even the most serious, dramatic fiction.

* Conceptualize and write a short story of your own (or revise/analyze an existing piece of yours) that incorporates humor using the tools we’ve learned in class.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1

You will begin with a short tutorial on humor and the first assigned, very short funny stories. You will discuss the most effective humor elements, and how POV affects the humor in each story.

Week 2

You will read and discuss assigned stories and start writing (or rewriting) your own short story.

Week 3

You will read and discuss assigned stories and continue working on your short story.

Week 4

You will read and discuss assigned stories. You will also submit the piece you’ve been working on. The instructor will get back to each student with individual notes and answer any follow-up questions.

Learning Activities: Each week we’ll read a pair of stories and discuss them in detail. The syllabus provides prompts to get the discussion going—but students are encouraged to come up with their own questions and avenues of thought.

ABOUT ROBERT MORGAN FISHER

 

Robert Morgan Fisher

Robert Morgan Fisher’s fiction has appeared in The Arkansas ReviewRed Wheelbarrow, The Missouri Review Soundbooth Podcast, Dime Show Review0-Dark-ThirtyThe Huffington PostPsychopompThe Seattle ReviewThe Spry Literary Journal34th ParallelThe Journal of MicroliteratureSpindriftBluerailroad and many other publications. He has a story in the 2016 Skyhorse Books definitive anthology on speculative war fiction, Deserts of Fire. He’s written for TV, radio and film. Robert holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Antioch University, where he works as a Book Coach and Writing Specialist. He also develops courses and teaches for Antioch’s online I2P Program and runs a weekly writing workshop for veterans with PTSD in conjunction with UCLA. He often writes companion songs to his short stories. Both his music and fiction have won many awards. Robert also voices audiobooks. (www.robertmorganfisher.com)

 

SUBMIT! How to get your work out there with Kate Maruyama
$99.00
| Led By April 3 - April 17, 2017
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BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!

You can write and write and get better, but unless you submit your work widely, it might never meet its readers. Submitting your work takes courage, persistence and knowhow. So many people give up after one or two rejections. Learn how to effectively submit your fiction, non-fiction, poetry and articles to literary journals, online journals and other publications.

Click here to save 10% when you purchase this course as part of Professional Development Package. 

April 3 - April 17, 2017

2-Week Class

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In a two week intensive course, I’ll walk you through the submission process for fiction, non-fiction and poetry, from scouting websites and journals to how to get over yourself, move past the rejection process and use submission for what it is: just another everyday part of the business.

CLASS OBJECTIVES

*Learn the ins and outs of literary journals, what they look for and how they work

*Create your own list of journals or publications open to your kind of work

*Submit a piece (or several pieces) of your work at least five places

*Obtain the tools to keep submitting on your own well into the future

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week One: The Lay of the Land

We’ll discuss what’s out there publication-wise: the ins and outs of various types of journals and various types of submissions and we’ll create a plan for what you want from your work as you send it out in the world.

You’ll become acquainted with Duotrope, which will help you navigate the world of literary journals and will help you in your submission plan. (note this service costs $5.00 to be paid to DuoTrope) You will also learn how to keep track of where you submit your work and how to gauge editors’ responses.

Week Two: Submit!

I’ll walk you through query letters, submission letters, how to approach editors and how to see the positive in rejections. You’ll submit at least five places and finish class armed with the tools and knowledge to keep getting your work out there as you forge forward in your writing career.

ABOUT KATE MARUYAMA

Kate Maruyama

Kate Maruyama's novel HARROWGATE was published by 47North. Her short work has appeared in Arcadia, Stoneboat, Whistling Shade and on Salon, Duende, The Rumpus among other journals as well as in two anthologies: Winter Horror Days and Phantasma: Stories. She teaches in the BA and MFA programs for Antioch University Los Angeles as well as for Writing Workshops Los Angeles and the inspiration2publication program. She writes, teaches, cooks and eats in Los Angeles where she lives with her family.

 

Putting the Creative in a Creative Nonfiction Memoir with Patrick O'Neil
$199.00
| Led By April 10 - May 8, 2017
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Creative nonfiction merges literary fiction (and possibly poetry), research nonfiction, and journalism. It employs the same literary devices as fiction, such as setting, voice, and character development. This is what makes it different from standard nonfiction writing, and that difference is what this course is about. We will explore the use of scenes, dialogue, character arcs, and timelines; as well as discuss the difference between actual memories, and memories clouded by fear, resentments, and the passing of time.

April 10 - May 8, 2017

4-Week Online Writing Course

This course will focus on the use of literary devices in nonfiction. There will be four lectures to read, and we will discuss one topic each week. Students will submit a short work of nonfiction/memoir at the beginning of the course. Then over the next four weeks they will revisit their original submissions and revise them using instructor notes and the ideas and materials that have been presented and discussed each week. On the final week they will submit their revised manuscript.

CLASS LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Students will be encouraged to develop their own writing within the context of Creative Nonfiction Memoir. We will analyze various elements traditionally considered as craft utilized by writers of fiction. Our focus will be to learn how to incorporate those elements into our writing. The course will invite students to consider the issues raised in the process of writing memoir, aiming to uncover various methods of confronting potential problems. Through lectures and group discussions students will be provided information that they can use to analysis and revise their own writing.

Recommended Texts:

While not required reading, these memoirs successfully utilize the literary devices we will be discussing.
Liars’ Club, Mary Karr
Permanent Midnight, Jerry Stahl
The Glass Castle, Jeannette Wells
The Los Angeles Diaries, James Brown
Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson
Let’s Not Go To The Dogs Tonight, Alexandra Fuller
Another Bullshit Night In Suck City, Nick Flynn
The Bill From My Father, Bernard Cooper

Class Schedule:

WEEK 1

Lecture: Scene/Setting: descriptive scenery and the responsibility of each scene as it pertains to the basic idea of your writing.

* Student introductory discussion, and discussion on topic of lecture.

* Students submit short work of nonfiction/memoir (no more than 5-7 pages)

WEEK 2

Lecture: Dialogue: develop an ear for actual dialogue. Minimizing “wordiness” to better express emotion. Recreating dialogue from past events, and utilizing dialect, the pro’s and con’s of grammatical gymnastics.

* Student discussion on lecture topic

* Students work on writing exercise and revising their original submission.

WEEK 3

Lecture: Character Development: through the use of description, dialogue, actions, and non-actions. How to make your characters come alive by showing, not telling. And the narrator as a character

* Student discussion on lecture topic

* Students work on writing exercise and revising their original submission.

WEEK 4

Lecture: Memory/Timeline/Structure – what to use, and what not to use, creative editing of reality, and the reliability of memory.

* Students discussion on lecture topic, and the revision process

* Students submit revised original submission of nonfiction/memoir (no page limit)

ABOUT PATRICK O'NEIL

Patrick O’Neil is the author of the memoir Gun, Needle, Spoon (Dzanc Books). His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including Juxtapoz, Salon, The Nervous BreakdownAfter Party Magazine, and Razorcake. O’Neil is a contributing editor for Sensitive Skin Magazine, a Pushcart nominee, a two time nominee for Best Of The Net, and a PEN Center USA Professional and former Mentor. He holds an MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles where he is an instructor for the inspiration2publication program. Most days you can find him teaching some form of creative writing at various rehabs, correctional facilities, institutions, and workshopsand he is the co-coordinator for the Why There Are Words, Los Angeles reading series. O’Neil currently lives in L.A.’s monument to broken dreams, the über hip downtown district, with his fiancé and two giant Maine Coons. For more information, please visit: patrick-oneil.com.

 

Making Poems: Turning Thoughts, Memories, and Life Experiences into Poetry with Dana L. Stringer
$199.00
| Led By May 1 - May 29, 2017
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There are numerous approaches to poetry writing, and in this exciting 4-Week introductory course, designed for writers who are new to the poetry genre, students will learn the essential nuts and bolts of poetry writing in a safe and supportive online environment. The course will primarily focus on free verse poetry and introduce the use of specific poetic devices to help craft effective poems. Students will write poems prompted by writing exercises, provide peer feedback, read selected poems from contemporary poets, and participate in online discussions.

May 1 - May 29, 2017

4-Week Online Writing Course

COURSE OBJECTIVES

The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to the basic elements of poetry writing, familiarize students with key terminology, help students develop their poetic voice, assist students in crafting poems and gain a solid understanding of the art and craft of poetry writing.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

WEEK 1

In the first week, students will learn the role of the line in poetry by exploring the various effects created with line breaks, line length, stanzas, pauses, enjambment, end-stop, and punctuation.  Students will draft their first poem, post it, and receive peer feedback.  Students will also read and discuss a selected poem.

WEEK 2

In the second week, students will learn key terminology and how to employ the use of figurative language in poetry. Emphasis will also be placed on the use of concrete and sensory details. Students will draft their second poem, post it, and receive peer feedback.  Students will also read and discuss a selected poem. 

WEEK 3

In the third week, students will explore the use of sound devices that contributes to musical qualities of poetry. Students will draft their third poem, post it, and receive peer feedback.  Students will also read and discuss a selected poem. 

WEEK 4

In the final week, we will discuss helpful tools and resources available for poetry students, including important websites, poetry readings, workshops, and essential poetry books to read.  There will be an open forum discussion where students can ask any additional questions concerning specific poetry topics.

About Dana L. Stringer:

Dana L. Stringer

About Dana L. Stringer

Dana L. Stringer is a poet, playwright, freelance writer, and instructor.  She holds an MFA in Creative Writing from Antioch University Los Angeles and a BA from Morehead State University.  Her debut collection of poetry, In Between Faith, was published in 2014, and she has been a featured poet in various venues across the country.  Dana’s work has appeared in literary journals as well as anthologies.  She has also served as a contributing writer and associate editor for online and print outlets.  In addition, Dana is a produced playwright and a member of Working Title Playwrights.  Her produced plays and staged readings include:  Looter, Secret Life in a Sacred House, Colored in Winter, Solomon’s Porch, The Costume Waver, ID, and Kinsman Redeemer.  Dana is currently an instructional facilitator at Antioch University Los Angeles and an academic writing tutor for a nationally recognized eLearning corporation, serving colleges, universities, libraries, and school districts.  She is based in Atlanta, Georgia.  For more information, visit:  www.danastringer.com.

 

A Writing Practice with Andrea Tate
$99.00
May 8 - May 21, 2017
A Writing Practice with Andrea Tate
$99.00
| Led By May 8 - May 21, 2017
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Jump start your writing practice and produce real results. Join published writer/professor Andrea Tate, MFA, in an online community that promises to motivate you into creating a writing practice that works.

May 8 - May 21, 2017

2-Week Writing Course

CLASS DESCRIPTION

This class is for those writers who let days, weeks, and months fly by without generating publishable work. Inspiration2publication offers classes that include publishing, submitting, querying, but what about those of us who will do anything to postpone their writing practice?

We can’t query, submit, or publish unless we write first!

We’re talking about writers who have had every excuse not to sit in the chair and bang out that first shitty draft. Andrea is the first to admit she’d do anything not to have to sit at her desk. Her back hurt, so she had to wait until her standing desk came. Her desk came but then the lighting in her office sucked. After getting a new desk lamp, she decided it was the rug, the temperature, the color of the walls, and on and on. She’d choose laundry over writing. Whatever she could do to avoid the chair—she’d sit in the dentist’s chair before sitting in her own. She finally realized she was never going to write a damn thing unless she had a practice. Once that happened, she began to write, query, submit, and PUBLISH! However, everyone’s practice is unique. This course will help you discover your unique practice.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER:

Week 1: Narrowing Down the Problem and Eliminating the Excuses

In Week One we will have a new exercise daily. Here are examples of our first two days:

Day One: Before getting out of bed, write down how you think of yourself as a writer. Use adjectives and list as many as possible. "Lame," "Lazy," "Empty," you will post these adjectives then explain "why" you think these are true. Andrea's adjectives were, "Dumb,"Busy,"Resentful." After sharing these words and the reasons "why" you use them to describe yourself, you will come to realize these words are not serving you, and are most likely extremely false. We will then help you create your new words. These words will become your mantra. These words will act like your favorite mentor cheering you on.

Day Two: You will pick a time today where you are free to write. I'm talking about at least two or three solid hours where you have no interruptions. You will write up to 500 words using a prompt from the class. You will then share your writing for feedback and include a reflection of any challenges, and or successes with this writing exercise.

Week 2: Putting the New Practice Into Place

Once we eliminate the evil excuses that cause you to be a “writer who never writes,” we will put the new practice into place. Our online community will share their successes and tips for what is working and what needs adjusting. By the end of the two weeks, you will have a personalized plan that works for you, plus new writer friends who will support you. We promise that you, and the seat of your chair, will finally become one.

ABOUT ANDREA TATE

Andrea Tate

Andrea Tate is an adjunct writing professor at Antioch University, Santa Barbara. Her essays have appeared in the Huffington Post, Role/Reboot, A Daily Dose of Lit, andBleed. Andrea’s story “You” was published in the anthology Extract(s) in 2014, and is part of a memoir currently in progress. Andrea is an award-winning theatre director and an advocate for theatre arts in early education. She teaches acting and nonfiction writing workshops for Hillcrest Center for the Arts in Thousand Oaks. Andrea received her MFA in Creative Nonfiction from Antioch University Los Angeles. 

 

Introduction to Fiction
$199.00
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Introduction to Fiction

Learn the basics of fiction and start working on a short story or a novel in this recurring course taught by one of our fiction instructors. 

inspiration2publication offers this 4-week online workshop on a regular basis when we get at least three students to sign up. Let us know if you want to take this course with your writing group! 

Sign up using the form below to be notified when we offer this workshop next time! Email all your questions to i2p@antioch.edu

Introduction to Fiction

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