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Introduction to Fiction
$199.00
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Introduction to Fiction

Learn the basics of fiction and start working on a short story or a novel in this recurring course taught by one of our fiction instructors. 

inspiration2publication offers this 4-week online workshop on a regular basis when we get at least three students to sign up. Let us know if you want to take this course with your writing group! 

Sign up using the form below to be notified when we offer this workshop next time! Email all your questions to i2p@antioch.edu

Introduction to Fiction

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Get Cultured! An Inside Track to Culture Writing with Lily Caraballo
$199.00
| Led By May 6 - June 3, 2019
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Go to any publication on the web and you will find under the “Culture” section various essays that cover everything from literature, art, and music to current events and politics we’re dealing with today, even with the internet itself. Culture writing can be a fun way to take a more critical look at these categories through a personal lens.

I worked as a reporter for an entertainment website for a short while and during that time, I got a chance to talk with artists and creators and gain new insight into their creative works. It gave me a new perspective in engaging with movies and television, and motivation to critically analyze the media I consume.

For my four week course, we’ll take a closer look at what culture writing is and identify the lens through which you want to approach it. We’ll look at articles that cover every category, brainstorm ideas on approaching the subject you’re most passionate about, and work on creating a strong first draft.

Four Week Course

May 6 - June 3, 2019

CLASS OBJECTIVES

Pitch and draft an idea for an essay that revolves on topics that include but are not limited to:

--Music

--Art

--Literature

--Video Games

--Politics

--Current Events

--Movies

Gain a thorough understanding of what culture writing is

Critique and give feedback on pitches and drafts from peers

Identify how culture writing is used to spark discussions of significant events

LEARNING ACTIVITIES

Read articles from websites to get an understanding of what culture writing is

Pitch and draft an idea for an essay on culture

Share draft with peers for feedback

Find and share examples of culture writing with other peers

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week One:

Read and discuss articles that are examples of culture writing with peers

Brainstorm on topics that will serve as the foundation of your work in the course

Week Two:

Write and share a pitch for a culture essay

Critique and give feedback to peers on their pitches

Revise pitch based on feedback  

Explain the reason behind your essay pitch

Week Three:

Find and read an article from the Culture section of a website or publication

Share article with peers and discuss  

Explain what hooked you into the article you shared

Week Four

Write a rough draft of an essay based on your pitch

Share draft of the work with peers for workshop and critique

Revise draft based on feedback from peers

ABOUT LILY CARABALLO

Lily Caraballo is a recent graduate of Antioch University Los Angeles with an MFA in Creative Writing, where she joined the staff of Lunch Ticket as an Associate Editor and contributor for their Interview and Blog teams. She previously wrote for the entertainment website Black Girl Nerds, was featured in the anthology My Body, My Words: A Collection of Bodies, and has work forthcoming in The Rumpus. She lives in Los Angeles, where she works as a figure model in her spare time.

 

Poetry for Everybody with Julia Knowlton
$199.00
May 6 - June 3, 2019
Poetry for Everybody with Julia Knowlton
$199.00
| Led By May 6 - June 3, 2019
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Welcome to "Poetry for Everybody!" I have named my course "Poetry for Everybody" in order to debunk the perception that poetry is intimidating.  That need not be the case; when we consider even the earliest nursery rhymes (think of "Row, Row, Row your Boat" in English, for example), we realize that poetry has been with us since we were little children. Poetry is the music of language, and it is open to us all.

Poetry transcends our common and uncommon experiences through language that transforms ordinary language into something extraordinary.  In this class, we will see how "poetry is the shadow cast by our imaginations," to use the poet Ferlinghetti's phrase. I invite you to walk through the door of common language into the uncommon pleasures of the poem: its dream, its surprise, and its mystery.

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Explore the fundamentals of poetic structure: line, image, and sound.  Learn to differentiate poetry from other traditional literary genres while appreciating hybrid forms. Examine diverse voices in contemporary American poetry. Write and revise original poems with guidance and input of instructor. Consider writing goals for the course duration and beyond: revision, submission, etc. Foster physical or online writing community.

 

Four Week Online Class 

May 6 - June 3, 2019

 

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

In this class, participants will:

-- study and reflect on the creative writing process

-- engage critically with primary texts

-- create and revise original poems

--receive feedback and mentoring from a creative writing professional

ASSIGNED READINGS

Readings will include an interview on craft with Ada Limon and poems by Mary Oliver, W.S. Merwin and Terrence Hayes.  Students will be encouraged to read additional works.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES

Week 1: Understanding the Creative Writing Process

We will gain insight into the creative writing process by reading and discussing this interview with the award-winning poet Ada Limon:

Week 2: What Makes a Poem a Poem?

We will read and discuss "The Five Most Important Elements of Poetry."

Week 3: Reading Poems

We will study and engage in online discussion of poems by W.S. Merwin, Terrence Hayes, and Mary Oliver.  We will focus on the five elements of poetry that we studied in week 2: imagery, density, line, rhythm, and sound.  How do these poets master these five elements? Which element do you want to cultivate the most in your own poems?

Week 4: Writing Poems

We will write and revise at least two new poems, with input from the instructor.

ABOUT THE INSTRUCTOR

 

Poetry is a life-long passion of mine, and I am excited to share it with you! I am the author of a scholarly book, a memoir (Body Story, 2004) and a chapbook of poems (Café of Unintelligible Desire, 2018). My first full-length collection of poetry, One Clean Feather, will be published in 2020 by Finishing Line Press. My poems have appeared in numerous journals, including Roanoke Review and Raw Art Review. I am the recipient of an Academy of American Poets College Prize as well as a Pushcart nominee.  I work full-time as a college professor of French in Atlanta, GA and I travel to France as often as possible. In my spare time, I enjoy cinema, travel, and yoga.

 

Laying Down the Tracks: Jump Start Your Screenplay in Four Short Weeks with Kate Maruyama
$199.00
| Led By June 3 - July 1, 2019
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In this class, we will go over the basics of screenplay structure, character and scene and will get you jump started on your screenplay in a friendly workshop environment. With your classmates, you will also work up a pitch that will not only help you move your screenplay forward, but work it into a marketable entity.

June 3 - July 1, 2019 

4-Week Online Writing Class 

CLASS OBJECTIVES

*To learn the basics of screenplay structure and scene.

*To learn how to create a pitch that will both further your screenwriting and help eventually sell others on the idea of your screenplay.

*To come away with a solid take on Act I of your screenplay.

*Obtain the tools to keep submitting on your own well into the future.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1: Scene

What makes a good scene? What are your basic elements and who are your main characters? Through scene you will be able to get to know your characters and what they want and be able to launch forward. Examples of great scenes will be given in class.

Week 2: The Three Act Structure

A movie’s blueprint. We will go over what needs to happen in three acts, with emphasis on the characters and situation you’ve created. We will ask questions of your story and get a solid sketch of an outline with which to move forward.

Week 3: The Pitch:

In screenwriting the pitch is everything! I will give you the basics of what makes a solid pitch, both elevator length and two page submission-worthy pitch. You will, having outlined your story, work it into a pitch to share with your classmates and workshop.

Week 4: Act I the Workshop:

By now you will have written Act I! We will discuss your work in a workshop environment and come up with an action plan for continuing your screenplay outside of class.

ABOUT KATE MARUYAMA

Kate Maruyama

Kate Maruyama’s twenty years in the film industry started when she was an agency assistant at William Morris, where she learned the ins and outs, from contracts to deals, indie movies to studios films, indie releases to negative pickup. She moved on to Jon Peters Entertainment where she worked as a development assistant, developing pitches, giving notes on screenplays and finally was Director of Development at Sylvester Stallone’s company White Eagle at Universal where she worked with writers and executives developing pitches and screenplays for production. She was a script consultant for Demarest Films and for Village Roadshow Pictures for ten years. She then quit to write and learned the other side of the screenwriting world, with a number of scripts in development and had one screenplay produced. She has consulted on numerous screenplays since and has a knack for developing them into the type of material producers and actors are looking for.

Her first novel Harrowgate was published by 47North and she appears in numerous print and online journals as well as in anthologies.

Kate holds an MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles in fiction where she is adjunct faculty in the BA program and Affiliate faculty in the MFA program. She teaches with Writing Workshops Los Angeles and is part of the team behind Antioch’s inspiration2publication program.

 

Putting the Creative in a Creative Nonfiction Memoir with Patrick O'Neil
$199.00
| Led By June 3 - July 1, 2019
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Creative nonfiction merges literary fiction (and possibly poetry), research nonfiction, and journalism. It employs the same literary devices as fiction, such as setting, voice, and character development. This is what makes it different from standard nonfiction writing, and that difference is what this course is about. We will explore the use of scenes, dialogue, character arcs, and timelines; as well as discuss the difference between actual memories, and memories clouded by fear, resentments, and the passing of time.

4-Week Online Writing Course

June 3 - July 1, 2019

This course will focus on the use of literary devices in nonfiction. There will be four lectures to read, and we will discuss one topic each week. Students will submit a short work of nonfiction/memoir at the beginning of the course. Then over the next four weeks they will revisit their original submissions and revise them using instructor notes and the ideas and materials that have been presented and discussed each week. On the final week they will submit their revised manuscript.

CLASS LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Students will be encouraged to develop their own writing within the context of Creative Nonfiction Memoir. We will analyze various elements traditionally considered as craft utilized by writers of fiction. Our focus will be to learn how to incorporate those elements into our writing. The course will invite students to consider the issues raised in the process of writing memoir, aiming to uncover various methods of confronting potential problems. Through lectures and group discussions students will be provided information that they can use to analysis and revise their own writing.

Recommended Texts:

While not required reading, these memoirs successfully utilize the literary devices we will be discussing.
Liars’ Club, Mary Karr
Permanent Midnight, Jerry Stahl
The Glass Castle, Jeannette Wells
The Los Angeles Diaries, James Brown
Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson
Let’s Not Go To The Dogs Tonight, Alexandra Fuller
Another Bullshit Night In Suck City, Nick Flynn
The Bill From My Father, Bernard Cooper

Class Schedule:

WEEK 1

Lecture: Scene/Setting: descriptive scenery and the responsibility of each scene as it pertains to the basic idea of your writing.

* Student introductory discussion, and discussion on topic of lecture.

* Students submit short work of nonfiction/memoir (no more than 5-7 pages)

WEEK 2

Lecture: Dialogue: develop an ear for actual dialogue. Minimizing “wordiness” to better express emotion. Recreating dialogue from past events, and utilizing dialect, the pro’s and con’s of grammatical gymnastics.

* Student discussion on lecture topic

* Students work on writing exercise and revising their original submission.

WEEK 3

Lecture: Character Development: through the use of description, dialogue, actions, and non-actions. How to make your characters come alive by showing, not telling. And the narrator as a character

* Student discussion on lecture topic

* Students work on writing exercise and revising their original submission.

WEEK 4

Lecture: Memory/Timeline/Structure – what to use, and what not to use, creative editing of reality, and the reliability of memory.

* Students discussion on lecture topic, and the revision process

* Students submit revised original submission of nonfiction/memoir (no page limit)

ABOUT PATRICK O'NEIL

Patrick O’Neil is the author of the memoir Gun, Needle, Spoon (Dzanc Books). His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including Juxtapoz, Salon, The Nervous BreakdownAfter Party Magazine, and Razorcake. O’Neil is a contributing editor for Sensitive Skin Magazine, a Pushcart nominee, a two time nominee for Best Of The Net, and a PEN Center USA Professional and former Mentor. He holds an MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles where he is an instructor for the inspiration2publication program. Most days you can find him teaching some form of creative writing at various rehabs, correctional facilities, institutions, and workshopsand he is the co-coordinator for the Why There Are Words, Los Angeles reading series. O’Neil currently lives in L.A.’s monument to broken dreams, the über hip downtown district, with his fiancé and two giant Maine Coons. For more information, please visit: patrick-oneil.com.

Sign up using the form below to be notified when we offer this class next time! Email all your questions to i2p@antioch.edu

 

Art of the Query Letter: How to Woo an Agent from the Slush Pile with Lilly Barels
$99.00
| Led By June 10 - 24, 2019
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So, you wrote a book and now it's waiting to be on bookshelves. If you aren't planning to self-publish and the owner of Penguin Random House isn't your cousin, then you probably need a literary agent. Join me for this 2-week crash course that'll get you down and dirty with the elusive query letter. We'll use real examples that worked--including mine! And create a plan of action for taking your query into the world of literary agent slush piles. 


(P.S. if you aren't sure what the heck a slush pile is, I'll be sure to explain that too).

June 10 - 24, 2019

2-Week Course

CLASS OBJECTIVES

-- Complete a final draft of a query letter
-- Understand how to find the right agent for the manuscript being queried
-- Recognize when to query
-- Create an action plan for the querying process
 
Learning Activities:
-- Research/read successful query letters and understand why they work
-- Write a complete query letter
-- Share query drafts with peers to discuss strengths and opportunities for growth

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1:
-- Read real samples of successful query letters
-- Become familiar with the essential paragraph structure of a query letter
-- Write the first draft of a query letter
-- Trade queries with other students and provide/receive feedback
-- Start the query action plan
Week 2:
-- Understand the slush pile of a literary agent's inbox
-- Identify three agents that the student would like to query
-- Discover the general process of querying, which includes setting realistic expectations regarding the email process and receiving manuscript requests
-- Complete the final draft of the query letter
-- Complete the query action plan
 

ABOUT LILLY BARELS
 

A decade after receiving her BS in neuroscience from UCLA and being named Valedictorian, Lilly decided to pursue her true passion for writing and received her MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles in 2014. She resides on Oahu as a full-time mother of two sandy children and a part-time writer of three novels. Lilly enjoys being an active member of the SCBWI and incorporates avocado into every possible meal. She is represented by Sarah LaPolla of Bradford Literary Agency. Connect with Lilly on Twitter @lillybarels

 

Writing the Queer Body with Antonia Crane
$199.00
June 17 - July 15, 2019
Writing the Queer Body with Antonia Crane
$199.00
| Led By June 17 - July 15, 2019
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In Writing the Queer Body, a 4-week hybrid creative nonfiction/fiction class, we will bring our queerness to the page by stepping inside/outside the slippery, messy, beautiful strange shadow of our labeled gender identity and explore gender POV from multiple angles. You will write about a first time as another gender. And you will write a short story and scene containing queer themes. During the 4-week course, you will embody “otherness” on the page.

How do we name and embrace our marginalized identities, our unique sexualities and our labels? We draw upon our lived experiences to build a collective analysis of systemic injustice, organize together for change and rebel against systems in place. “Queer” implies boundedness and fluidity. It implies other, it implies together.

To borrow from writer, teacher, performer, activist Steve Yelvington-Jones:

“Queer” emerges as an anti-identity identity. An identity or identities that embraces (embrace) its (their) own instability. An identity that (at its best) acknowledges the upside downers of “identity politics”—to name our experiences, to name oppression, to use those experiences as the basis for articulating a vision for bold queer social change—while also challenging essentialism, challenging rigid identities, and perhaps even more profoundly, challenging the very system through which our identities have been named as “other.’

Queer redirects scrutiny onto those systems of classification. Queer picks at “normal’ like a scab, then eats it. Queer negates labels or else queer embraces many labels. Queer asks what the fuck is a label anyway?”

Bring your so-called labels to class and we shall get busy unpeeling them. Although we will be reading excerpts by serious queer pioneers like: David Wojnarowitz Monique Wittig and Kathy Acker, we will remember Queer has a playfulness to it in word and concept that welcomes mixed messages and blurry Sapphic salaciousness.

June 17 - July 15, 2019

4-Week Writing Class

CLASS OBJECTIVES

  • Course Goals: Participants will consider elements of craft related to gender (theme, dialogue, characters, setting, pacing, exposition), community in producing artful, original works of their own from 1000-1500 words. Students will have completed one edited piece ready-for-possible publication, with rough draft versions for many more. By the end of the course, students will be comfortable sharing their writing and offering constructive criticism to others.
     
  • Group discussions will focus on exploring gender POV from multiple angles, particularly that which is other than the author’s given gender.
     
  • Writing exercises will be used to explore the terrain of gender POV, to write about “what we don’t know” and stepping outside of our familiar routine selves in order to imagine unique sexualities and inject characters with gobs of heart.
     
  • Reading material will be aimed at exploring gender identity and elements of craft in scenes and compelling personal essays. Specifically, we will question the terrain of gender and what we assume in our culture about sex and gender. Through our readings, we will use gender and queerness as a literary tool for liberation and social justice in our essays/stories. Participants will be expected to read supplied material and engage in a critical way that will inform and progress their own work.
     
  • Posting our work to the discussions will allow participants to receive feedback from their peers about gender and POV as well as give thoughtful, descriptive and helpful input to their peers on how they utilized queerness to enhance their work.
     
  • Instructor will take the participants through the revision process from a first draft to a well-crafted personal essay or short story.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1: Becoming “I”

Lecture: My personal experience with writing about being queer and having a unique sexuality and how those experiences inform my work. Students will complete a writing prompt. Student introductory discussion.

Week 2: Becoming “We” Queer Voices & Queer Bodies

Lecture: Exploring the Queer Body in scene: Excerpts by David Wojnarowitz, Monique Wittig and Kathy Acker. We will remember Queer contains playfulness— as both word and concept that welcomes mixed messages and flips power dynamics and binaries. Students will complete a writing prompt. Student discussion on lecture topic.

Week 3: A Sense of Scene: Sex, Identity and Crisis

Lecture: Why Do Little Drag Queens Play With Dolls?” by Tim Yelvington-Jones: We will focus on the crisis of coming out and what it looks like on the page to reveal oneself fully. Participants will complete the third writing assignment. Student discussion on lecture topic of bravery on the page.

Week 4: Queer Community & Revision

Lecture: Suggested resources: Queer publications to submit your work. Writing assignment: Revision. Student discussion on lecture topic, and the process of revision. Each week there will be a lecture, a discussion forum, a writing assignment, and optional extra reading material. Instructor will give detailed feedback on the first assignment and works with participant to revise and edit that assignment for a final draft.

ABOUT ANTONIA CRANE

antonia crane

Antonia Crane is the author of the memoir, Spent (Barnacle Books, Rare Bird Lit). She is a writing instructor, stripper and performer in Los Angeles. She has written for The New York TimesThe BelieverThe Toast, Playboy, Cosmopolitan, Salon.com, The Huffington Post, The Rumpus, Electric Literature, DAME, The Establishment, The Los Angeles Review, Quartz: The Atlantic Media, Bustle, Medium.com, Buzzfeed, Lenny Letter and lots of other places. Her screenplay The Lusty (co-written by Transparent director, writer Silas Howard), based on the true story of the exotic dancer’s labor union, is a recipient of the San Francisco Film Society/Kenneth Rainin Foundation Grant in screenwriting. She is a Producer for several episodes of the scripted internet series DRIVEN, and she wrote and produced Episode Poppy starring Breeda Wool and Sam Ball. She has appeared on CNN’s This is Life with Lisa Ling and has been interviewed on WTF with Marc Maron and Michael Smerconish on httpss://www.siriusxm.com/potus where he compared dancers to Uber drivers.  She is currently writing and producing films for the Sex Worker Community at large. 

 

(Re)Work It: Learning to Edit Professionally for Yourself and for Publishers with Seth Fischer
$99.00
| Led By June 24 - July 8, 2019
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You can write thousands of pages, but without editing, it’s unlikely any of those pages will see the light of day. And while writing sometimes feels an act of faith, editing is where you can master concrete techniques to improve your work. Learn how to map your narratives, improve your sentences, and add precision to every bit of writing you produce.

2-Week Class 

June 24 - July 8, 2019

 

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In a two-week intensive course, I’ll show you how the professional developmental editing process works for fiction and creative nonfiction, from looking at structure to copy editing each sentence to the minutia of proofreading. Get your work ahead of the curve or learn new marketable skills that writers and the publishing industry desperately need.

CLASS OBJECTIVES

  • Learn how the editorial process works, from developmental editing to copy editing and proofreading.

  • Discover how to map out a narrative and find signs that a sentence needs to be more precise.

  • Practice these tools on a short piece of your own, or one I can choose for you.

  • Obtain skills that will help you improve not just your own writing but the writing of everyone in your writing community. 

Week 1: Discussion and Submit

We'll discuss the ins and outs of the developmental editing process, which looks at the big picture in a book length narrative. We'll go over story mapping, tracking character arcs, and other macro-level editing tools. I'll also show you an example of a developmental edit, to see what they look like, and you'll submit a global edit of a short piece of your choosing.

Week 2: Practical Application

We'll discuss the ins and outs of the copy editing and proofreading process. We'll discuss consistency of voice, clarity, precision, and other road blocks you might run into at the sentence and paragraph level, and you'll practice this on a short piece of writing. 

ABOUT SETH FISCHER

 photo sethcolorwall_zpst0a6mkin.jpg

SETH FISCHER'S writing has appeared in Guernica, Joyland, Buzzfeed, PANK, and Best Sex Writing and listed as notable in The Best American Essays. He is a developmental editor for independent publishing houses and individual clients. Seth is also the nonfiction editor at The Nervous Breakdown and was a contributing editor at The Rumpus, and he teaches for Antioch University Los Angeles, UCLA-Extension, and Writing Workshops Los Angeles. 

Seth Fischer's writing has appeared in PANK, The Rumpus, Buzzfeed, Guernica, Lunch Ticket, and other publications, and he was the first Sunday editor at the online literary magazine The Rumpus. His essay "Notes from a Unicorn" was listed as a notable essay in The Best American Essays 2013 and was included in Best Sex Writing 2013. He was a 2014 Lambda Literary Emerging Voicing Fellow and a 2013 Jentel Arts Residency Program Fellow. He is also a professional developmental editor and ghostwriter, and he teaches at Antioch University Los Angeles and Writing Workshops Los Angeles.July 18 - August 1, 2016

 

You can write thousands of pages, but without editing, it’s unlikely any of those pages will see the light of day. And while writing sometimes feels an act of faith, editing is where you can master concrete techniques to improve your work. Learn how to map your narratives, improve your sentences, and add precision to every bit of writing you produce.

 

In a two-week intensive course, I’ll show you how the professional developmental editing process works for fiction and creative nonfiction, from looking at structure to copyediting each sentence to the minutia of proofreading. Get your work ahead of the curve or learn new marketable skills that writers and the publishing industry desperately need.

 

Class Objectives:

 

·      Learn how the editorial process works, from developmental editing to copyediting and proofreading

 

·      Discover how to map out a narrative and find signs that a sentence needs to be more precise

 

·      Practice these tools on a short piece of your own, or one I can choose for you

 

·      Obtain skills that will help you improve not just your own writing but the writing of everyone in your writing community

 

https://i2pregister.antiochla.edu/files/seth-fischer.jpg

 

About Seth Fischer:

 

Seth Fischer's writing has appeared in PANK, The Rumpus, Buzzfeed, Guernica, Lunch Ticket, and other publications, and he was the first Sunday editor at the online literary magazine The Rumpus. His essay "Notes from a Unicorn" was listed as a notable essay in The Best American Essays 2013 and was included in Best Sex Writing 2013. He was a 2014 Lambda Literary Emerging Voicing Fellow and a 2013 Jentel Arts Residency Program Fellow. He is also a professional developmental editor and ghostwriter, and he teaches at Antioch University Los Angeles and Writing Workshops Los Angeles.

 

 
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