Classes Enrolling Now

Catalog
My Account

Introduction to Fiction
$199.00
Add to Cart
Course Details
List Price: $199.00

Quantity:

Introduction to Fiction

Learn the basics of fiction and start working on a short story or a novel in this recurring course taught by one of our fiction instructors. 

inspiration2publication offers this 4-week online workshop on a regular basis when we get at least three students to sign up. Let us know if you want to take this course with your writing group! 

Sign up using the form below to be notified when we offer this workshop next time! Email all your questions to i2p@antioch.edu

Introduction to Fiction

* indicates required
 

 

 

 

Putting the Creative in a Creative Nonfiction Memoir with Patrick O'Neil
$199.00
| Led By June 3 - July 1, 2019
Add to Cart
Course Details
List Price: $199.00

Quantity:

Creative nonfiction merges literary fiction (and possibly poetry), research nonfiction, and journalism. It employs the same literary devices as fiction, such as setting, voice, and character development. This is what makes it different from standard nonfiction writing, and that difference is what this course is about. We will explore the use of scenes, dialogue, character arcs, and timelines; as well as discuss the difference between actual memories, and memories clouded by fear, resentments, and the passing of time.

4-Week Online Writing Course

June 3 - July 1, 2019

This course will focus on the use of literary devices in nonfiction. There will be four lectures to read, and we will discuss one topic each week. Students will submit a short work of nonfiction/memoir at the beginning of the course. Then over the next four weeks they will revisit their original submissions and revise them using instructor notes and the ideas and materials that have been presented and discussed each week. On the final week they will submit their revised manuscript.

CLASS LEARNING OBJECTIVES

Students will be encouraged to develop their own writing within the context of Creative Nonfiction Memoir. We will analyze various elements traditionally considered as craft utilized by writers of fiction. Our focus will be to learn how to incorporate those elements into our writing. The course will invite students to consider the issues raised in the process of writing memoir, aiming to uncover various methods of confronting potential problems. Through lectures and group discussions students will be provided information that they can use to analysis and revise their own writing.

Recommended Texts:

While not required reading, these memoirs successfully utilize the literary devices we will be discussing.
Liars’ Club, Mary Karr
Permanent Midnight, Jerry Stahl
The Glass Castle, Jeannette Wells
The Los Angeles Diaries, James Brown
Jesus’ Son, Denis Johnson
Let’s Not Go To The Dogs Tonight, Alexandra Fuller
Another Bullshit Night In Suck City, Nick Flynn
The Bill From My Father, Bernard Cooper

Class Schedule:

WEEK 1

Lecture: Scene/Setting: descriptive scenery and the responsibility of each scene as it pertains to the basic idea of your writing.

* Student introductory discussion, and discussion on topic of lecture.

* Students submit short work of nonfiction/memoir (no more than 5-7 pages)

WEEK 2

Lecture: Dialogue: develop an ear for actual dialogue. Minimizing “wordiness” to better express emotion. Recreating dialogue from past events, and utilizing dialect, the pro’s and con’s of grammatical gymnastics.

* Student discussion on lecture topic

* Students work on writing exercise and revising their original submission.

WEEK 3

Lecture: Character Development: through the use of description, dialogue, actions, and non-actions. How to make your characters come alive by showing, not telling. And the narrator as a character

* Student discussion on lecture topic

* Students work on writing exercise and revising their original submission.

WEEK 4

Lecture: Memory/Timeline/Structure – what to use, and what not to use, creative editing of reality, and the reliability of memory.

* Students discussion on lecture topic, and the revision process

* Students submit revised original submission of nonfiction/memoir (no page limit)

ABOUT PATRICK O'NEIL

Patrick O’Neil is the author of the memoir Gun, Needle, Spoon (Dzanc Books). His writing has appeared in numerous publications, including Juxtapoz, Salon, The Nervous BreakdownAfter Party Magazine, and Razorcake. O’Neil is a contributing editor for Sensitive Skin Magazine, a Pushcart nominee, a two time nominee for Best Of The Net, and a PEN Center USA Professional and former Mentor. He holds an MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles where he is an instructor for the inspiration2publication program. Most days you can find him teaching some form of creative writing at various rehabs, correctional facilities, institutions, and workshopsand he is the co-coordinator for the Why There Are Words, Los Angeles reading series. O’Neil currently lives in L.A.’s monument to broken dreams, the über hip downtown district, with his fiancé and two giant Maine Coons. For more information, please visit: patrick-oneil.com.

Sign up using the form below to be notified when we offer this class next time! Email all your questions to i2p@antioch.edu

 

 

 

 

(Re)Work It: Learning to Edit Professionally for Yourself and for Publishers with Seth Fischer
$99.00
| Led By June 24 - July 8, 2019
Add to Cart
Course Details
List Price: $99.00

Quantity:

You can write thousands of pages, but without editing, it’s unlikely any of those pages will see the light of day. And while writing sometimes feels an act of faith, editing is where you can master concrete techniques to improve your work. Learn how to map your narratives, improve your sentences, and add precision to every bit of writing you produce.

2-Week Class 

June 24 - July 8, 2019

 

CLASS DESCRIPTION

In a two-week intensive course, I’ll show you how the professional developmental editing process works for fiction and creative nonfiction, from looking at structure to copy editing each sentence to the minutia of proofreading. Get your work ahead of the curve or learn new marketable skills that writers and the publishing industry desperately need.

CLASS OBJECTIVES

  • Learn how the editorial process works, from developmental editing to copy editing and proofreading.

  • Discover how to map out a narrative and find signs that a sentence needs to be more precise.

  • Practice these tools on a short piece of your own, or one I can choose for you.

  • Obtain skills that will help you improve not just your own writing but the writing of everyone in your writing community. 

Week 1: Discussion and Submit

We'll discuss the ins and outs of the developmental editing process, which looks at the big picture in a book length narrative. We'll go over story mapping, tracking character arcs, and other macro-level editing tools. I'll also show you an example of a developmental edit, to see what they look like, and you'll submit a global edit of a short piece of your choosing.

Week 2: Practical Application

We'll discuss the ins and outs of the copy editing and proofreading process. We'll discuss consistency of voice, clarity, precision, and other road blocks you might run into at the sentence and paragraph level, and you'll practice this on a short piece of writing. 

ABOUT SETH FISCHER

 photo sethcolorwall_zpst0a6mkin.jpg

SETH FISCHER'S writing has appeared in Guernica, Joyland, Buzzfeed, PANK, and Best Sex Writing and listed as notable in The Best American Essays. He is a developmental editor for independent publishing houses and individual clients. Seth is also the nonfiction editor at The Nervous Breakdown and was a contributing editor at The Rumpus, and he teaches for Antioch University Los Angeles, UCLA-Extension, and Writing Workshops Los Angeles. 

Seth Fischer's writing has appeared in PANK, The Rumpus, Buzzfeed, Guernica, Lunch Ticket, and other publications, and he was the first Sunday editor at the online literary magazine The Rumpus. His essay "Notes from a Unicorn" was listed as a notable essay in The Best American Essays 2013 and was included in Best Sex Writing 2013. He was a 2014 Lambda Literary Emerging Voicing Fellow and a 2013 Jentel Arts Residency Program Fellow. He is also a professional developmental editor and ghostwriter, and he teaches at Antioch University Los Angeles and Writing Workshops Los Angeles.July 18 - August 1, 2016

 

You can write thousands of pages, but without editing, it’s unlikely any of those pages will see the light of day. And while writing sometimes feels an act of faith, editing is where you can master concrete techniques to improve your work. Learn how to map your narratives, improve your sentences, and add precision to every bit of writing you produce.

 

In a two-week intensive course, I’ll show you how the professional developmental editing process works for fiction and creative nonfiction, from looking at structure to copyediting each sentence to the minutia of proofreading. Get your work ahead of the curve or learn new marketable skills that writers and the publishing industry desperately need.

 

Class Objectives:

 

·      Learn how the editorial process works, from developmental editing to copyediting and proofreading

 

·      Discover how to map out a narrative and find signs that a sentence needs to be more precise

 

·      Practice these tools on a short piece of your own, or one I can choose for you

 

·      Obtain skills that will help you improve not just your own writing but the writing of everyone in your writing community

 

https://i2pregister.antiochla.edu/files/seth-fischer.jpg

 

About Seth Fischer:

 

Seth Fischer's writing has appeared in PANK, The Rumpus, Buzzfeed, Guernica, Lunch Ticket, and other publications, and he was the first Sunday editor at the online literary magazine The Rumpus. His essay "Notes from a Unicorn" was listed as a notable essay in The Best American Essays 2013 and was included in Best Sex Writing 2013. He was a 2014 Lambda Literary Emerging Voicing Fellow and a 2013 Jentel Arts Residency Program Fellow. He is also a professional developmental editor and ghostwriter, and he teaches at Antioch University Los Angeles and Writing Workshops Los Angeles.

 

 

 

 

Shaping the Queer Voice: A Collaborative, Multi-Genre Writing Class with Ken Pienkos
$199.00
| Led By July 8 - August 5, 2019
Add to Cart
Course Details
List Price: $199.00

Quantity:

Where LGBTQIA (Lesbian, Gay, Bi-sexual, Trans-gender, Questioning, Intersex, Asexual) Characters Intersect, Involve & Interact with Story for All Writers.

4-Week Online Writing Class

July 8 - August 5, 2019

CLASS DESCRIPTION

How do you define Queer Voice? This course speaks to most writers from a unique and emerging perspective. John Waters was quoted in June of 2015 to say, “Gay is not enough anymore.” Let’s ask: What do Queers have in common if they no longer share oppression?

Consider Borich’s definition of the aesthetic, “by queer aesthetic I mean not just the work of queer authors but all voices and forms that are equally open to pleasure and injury, that are not afraid of the body, that are both sex-positive and self-critical, that are as interested in intersections and critique as they are in the personal politics of memory.” Barrie Jean Borich, 2012.

These four weeks will support writers through the process of individual and specific craft prompts to explore character and situation development with their voices. We encourage an open dialogue that is not prescriptive; rather it will be supportive of a wide range of style, theme, and personality among writers who embrace “otherness.”

CLASS OBJECTIVES

Craft queer narrative with inclusion and multiple dimensions.

CLASS ACTIVITIES

Consider, talk about, and compare Queer voice in historic development and trending movements.

Speak out, experiment, and integrate characters in three-dimensional stories with weekly writing prompts and peer responses.

* Listen and respond to other writers methods for character development, setting, and structure.

* Complete a full cycle of draft, collaborative critical analysis, and revision of one original work over the four weeks.


Each week there will be a lecture, a discussion forum, a writing assignment, and optional extra reading material. The instructor will give detailed feedback on the first assignment and works with the participant to revise and edit that assignment for a final draft.

ABOUT KEN PIENKOS

Ken lives in Los Angeles with his dog Scooter and his husband, James. He holds a BS and MS in Library Science from Clarion University of Pennsylvania, and is a graduate of Antioch University Los Angeles MFA in Creative Writing Program and works at Antioch University as Reference & Instruction Librarian.Recent Publications and Spoken Word Performances include: Arts & Letters Literary Magazine, Rose Red Review (pending), Queerwise: Beloved Fictions, HIV Here & Now, SoloMojo and Shades of Disclosure On Stage at Skylight Theatre.

More at Ken's web-site: 

www.kenpienkos.com

 

 

 

 

A Writing Practice with Andrea Tate
$99.00
July 8 - 21, 2019
A Writing Practice with Andrea Tate
$99.00
| Led By July 8 - 21, 2019
Add to Cart
Course Details
List Price: $99.00

Quantity:

Jump start your writing practice and produce real results. Join published writer/professor Andrea Tate, MFA, in an online community that promises to motivate you into creating a writing practice that works.

2-Week Writing Class

July 8 - 21, 2019

CLASS DESCRIPTION

This class is for writers who let days, weeks, and months fly by without generating publishable work; it is for those of us who will do anything to postpone their writing practice.

You can’t query, submit, or publish unless you write first!

We’re talking about writers who use every excuse not to sit in the chair and bang out that first draft. Andrea is the first to admit she does everything and anything not to sit at her desk. Her back hurts, she’s hungry, she’s too full, she has laundry, or screw the laundry, she needs to shop for a new wardrobe ASAPThis course will help you discover your unique practice and eliminate the urge to avoid the chair. 

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER:

Week 1: Narrowing Down the Problem and Eliminating the Excuses

In Week One, you will have a new exercise daily. Here are examples of our first two days:

Day One: Before getting out of bed, write down how you think of yourself as a writer. Use adjectives and list as many as possible. "Lame," "Lazy," "Empty," you will post these adjectives then explain "why" you think these are true. After sharing these words and the reasons "why" you use them to describe yourself, you come to realize these words are not serving you, and are most likely extremely false. You create your new words. These words are your mantra. 

Day Two: You pick a time where you are free to write. I'm talking about at least two solid hours with no interruptions. You write up to 500 words using a prompt from class. You then share your writing for feedback and include a reflection of any challenges, and or successes with this writing exercise.

Week 2: Putting the New Practice Into Place

Once you eliminate the evil excuses that cause you to be a “writer who never writes,” we will put the new practice into place. Our online community will share their successes and tips for what is working and what needs adjusting. By the end of the two weeks, you will have a personalized plan that works for you, plus new writer friends who will support you. We promise that you, and the seat of your chair, will finally become one.

ABOUT ANDREA TATE

Andrea Tate is an affiliate writing professor at Antioch University, Santa Barbara. She is the faculty advisor and instructor for Odyssey Online Magazine. Her essays are published in Angels Flight Literary West,  HippocampusHuffington Post, Role/Reboot, Nailed Magazine, and Jaded Ibis Press. Her story “You” is published in the anthology Extract(s) and is part of a memoir currently in progress. Andrea holds an MA in English from Southern New Hampshire University, has a Post MFA in Teaching Creative Writing and an MFA in Creative Nonfiction from Antioch University Los Angeles where she also served as an editor on AULA’s Lunch Ticket. She lives in Agoura Hills with her husband, musician teenager, and a Shepard puppy she calls the Land Shark. 

 

 

 

 

Art of the Query Letter: How to Woo an Agent from the Slush Pile with Lilly Barels
$99.00
| Led By July 15 - 28, 2019
Add to Cart
Course Details
List Price: $99.00

Quantity:

So, you wrote a book and now it's waiting to be on bookshelves. If you aren't planning to self-publish and the owner of Penguin Random House isn't your cousin, then you probably need a literary agent. Join me for this 2-week crash course that'll get you down and dirty with the elusive query letter. We'll use real examples that worked--including mine! And create a plan of action for taking your query into the world of literary agent slush piles. 


(P.S. if you aren't sure what the heck a slush pile is, I'll be sure to explain that too).

June 10 - 24, 2019

2-Week Course

CLASS OBJECTIVES

-- Complete a final draft of a query letter
-- Understand how to find the right agent for the manuscript being queried
-- Recognize when to query
-- Create an action plan for the querying process
 
Learning Activities:
-- Research/read successful query letters and understand why they work
-- Write a complete query letter
-- Share query drafts with peers to discuss strengths and opportunities for growth

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1:
-- Read real samples of successful query letters
-- Become familiar with the essential paragraph structure of a query letter
-- Write the first draft of a query letter
-- Trade queries with other students and provide/receive feedback
-- Start the query action plan
Week 2:
-- Understand the slush pile of a literary agent's inbox
-- Identify three agents that the student would like to query
-- Discover the general process of querying, which includes setting realistic expectations regarding the email process and receiving manuscript requests
-- Complete the final draft of the query letter
-- Complete the query action plan
 

ABOUT LILLY BARELS
 

A decade after receiving her BS in neuroscience from UCLA and being named Valedictorian, Lilly decided to pursue her true passion for writing and received her MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles in 2014. She resides on Oahu as a full-time mother of two sandy children and a part-time writer of three novels. Lilly enjoys being an active member of the SCBWI and incorporates avocado into every possible meal. She is represented by Sarah LaPolla of Bradford Literary Agency. Connect with Lilly on Twitter @lillybarels

 

 

 

 

The World in a Flash: Flash Prose with Kate Maruyama
$199.00
July 22 - August 19, 2019
The World in a Flash: Flash Prose with Kate Maruyama
$199.00
| Led By July 22 - August 19, 2019
Add to Cart
Course Details
List Price: $199.00

Quantity:

Flash fiction, flash prose, sudden fiction, micro fiction. The definitions vary: “work under 1500 words” or “work under 1000 words,” and sometimes, “work under 500 words.” The good news is these small spaces can be quite dynamic and the creative possibilities within this form are endless.

Journals are looking for flash prose, and, as the pieces are so short, they can fit more in each issue, which ups your chances of publication. In this course we will do exercises which will generate your own flash prose and look at different ways in which various forms of flash prose work. We will workshop through revisions and you should come away with a few solid pieces, and, most important, the tools to keep generating flash prose that resonates.

This class is aimed around continuously generating new material over the course of the month. A writer CAN generate up to five new pieces a week, or choose to focus on a few pieces for the duration of the class.

4-Week Online Writing Class

July 22 - August 19, 2019

CLASS OBJECTIVES

• Generate new pieces of flash prose, fiction and non-fiction.

• Look at examples of flash prose that work and discuss in depth the variety of ways in which it can work.

• Workshop pieces of your flash prose with your instructor and peers.

• Rewrite your prose and prepare it to send out. Discuss marketplaces that take different kinds of flash prose and come up with a plan for submission.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER

Week 1. Flash Prose: Inside and Out

We will look at the variety of flash prose available, discuss its flexible form and talk about the ways in which it can compress time or slow it down. Using prompts, you will generate first draft pieces of flash prose.

Week 2: Workshop!

Workshop! You will workshop a piece of flash prose you have generated and rewritten in the prior week. Your peers will respond to your work and give you suggestions and tools to use to create a new draft. During this week, using prompts, you will continue generating new flash prose.

Week 3

Workshop and generating new work continues. In this week we look at examples useful to specific pieces generated by the group.

Week 4: Submit!

We talk about appropriate places to submit your work. Prompts are available for continued generation of work and we wrap up the workshop section.

ABOUT KATE MARUYAMA

Kate Maruyama's novel HARROWGATE was published by 47North. Her short work has appeared in Arcadia, Stoneboat, Whistling Shade and on Salon, Duende, The Rumpus among other journals as well as in two anthologies: Winter Horror Days and Phantasma: Stories. She teaches in the BA and MFA programs for Antioch University Los Angeles as well as for Writing Workshops Los Angeles and the inspiration2publication program. She writes, teaches, cooks and eats in Los Angeles where she lives with her family.

TESTIMONIALS: 

"As a poet, I have always wanted to explore more deeply the difference between prose poems and flash prose. When I won the raffle for a free class with I2P, I knew Kate’s class was the one I wanted to take. Kate is a talented and smart instructor. Her knowledge and love of flash prose were evident in the variety of reading assignments and her feedback. Her ability to balance leading a class and adapting to students’ interests and schedules is exceptional. She makes teaching an online class seem effortless! I completed the class with a better understanding of flash prose, but also with several workable pieces. Above all, Kate knows writers and particularly the type of writers that would enroll in an I2P class — writers with full lives around which we are trying to find those precious moments for writing. I told her I wanted to generate new pieces in the four weeks and each week she gave us five engaging prompts each week. Moreover, Kate encouraged us to choose if we wanted to post more in the generative discussions or the workshop discussions. This is essential in working with writers because we cannot always control when and where our writing will be within a 4-week workshop. I would highly recommend this course for writers of all genres who want to dig in for some close writing and work with a seasoned writer and editor like Kate."

~Lisa Cheby

 

 

 

 

Let's Write a Short Story with Natalie Truhan
$199.00
September 2 - 30, 2019
Let's Write a Short Story with Natalie Truhan
$199.00
| Led By September 2 - 30, 2019
Add to Cart
Course Details
List Price: $199.00

Quantity:

“When seriously explored, the short story seems to me the most difficult and disciplining form of prose writing extant. Whatever control and technique I may have I owe entirely to my training in this medium.”~ Truman Capote, interview to The Paris Review.

 

4-Week Writing Class

September 2 - 30. 2019 

This course will take you from story inception to a finished draft through several stages of revision. Along the way, you will learn elements of a short story. Our goal is creating a story that, as the writer Michael Swanwick put it, “is like a knife–strongly made, well balanced, and with an absolute minimum of moving parts.”

I want you to become a radical explorer of your story and its possibilities. I will encourage you to approach your story from different angles, striving to better understand your artistic intention and ways to realize it. 

The course is designed for writers of fiction who want to explore a structured approach to developing a traditional story, as well as for writers of creative nonfiction and poetry who want to delve into writing short fiction.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

By the end of this course, the students will be able to:

• identify the initial idea for a short story;
• develop a short story by exploring point of view, characterization, timeline, sensory detail, imagery, and more;
• share their work in progress and provide feedback which will help their peers write the best possible story.

WHAT THIS CLASS WILL OFFER: 

In Week 1 we will learn to identify the protagonist and the story.

In Week 2 we will do what Antonya Nelson calls “putting a clock on the story”.

In Week 3 we will explore theme and imagery.

In Week 4 will do something crazy and discuss what’s next for your story.

LEARNING ACTIVITIES:

• Writing exercises: Each week students will complete writing assignments that will take their stories from the initial idea to the finished draft.

• Share work and provide feedback in discussion forums: Students will post their writing and give feedback on each other’s work.

• Assigned readings: Students will read assigned short stories and discuss them in forums to develop a better understanding of elements of short fiction.

• Progress discussions: Students will be encouraged to discuss their progress and reflect on their process.

ABOUT NATALIE TRUHAN: 

natalie-truhan

Natalie received her MFA from Antioch University Los Angeles. She is a former Translation Editor of The Lunch Ticket literary journal. She lives in Los Angeles where she writes fiction and translates poetry. Connect with Natalie on Twitter or on Instagram.    

Interested in this course? Let us know.

* indicates required
 
 

 

 

 

 
12Next